Too much ‘idiot box’ leaves older folk lost for words

Readers above a certain age may well recall, several decades ago, regularly being told by parents and teachers that watching too much television rots the brain. Now, research by two scientists at University College London in the UK suggests that, at least metaphorically, the oldies were right. In a study covering a seven-year period, Daisy Fancourt and Andrew Steptoe tested the effect of television watching among people over 50 years old. Most research into the relationship between television and cognition, they point out, has focussed on children and adolescents - older people have been largely overlooked. The researchers used data from a long-term project called the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), an ongoing population-based mission to collect information regarding health, wellbeing and economic outcomes for over-50s To establish a baseline, they looked at television-watching data for 3662 adults recorded...

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Hands off the chocolate! First chocolate company to brag about being pro-GMO supports GMO cacao trees

While many companies fight against using genetically modified ingredients, and others do not care that they are using them, the first company to openly brag about being pro-GMO has officially arrived on the scene. That company is Ethos Chocolate, which is creating and selling its product with hopes that our beloved cacao trees will be genetically modified soon. Their project is supported by about 1,600 farmers of A Fresh Look, which also support GMOs. ...

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Nuclear medicine fallout: Cremated man’s ash spread radioactivity in local area – study

In 2017 a 69-year-old man living with pancreatic cancer was treated with nuclear medicine to shrink his tumor, but sadly died three days later and was cremated. New research suggests his remains may have spread radioactivity. The man was treated by radioactive injection, and the dose of lutetium Lu 177 dotatate was still in his body when he was cremated, as staff at the hospital where he was treated were unaware of how badly his condition had deteriorated before it was too late. While the administration of these drugs is tightly controlled and monitored, what happens after the treatment - especially when patients eventually die - is an entirely different story, as showcased in this particular case study by the Mayo Clinic. More than half of deceased Americans are cremated at present. "Radiopharmaceuticals present a unique and often overlooked postmortem...

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Stop iPhone parenting and give your children the attention they need

As a trauma therapist I am always interested in learning about my clients' childhood attachment patterns. Growing up with parents who were either emotionally unavailable, inconsistently responsive, frightened by or frightening to their child has a profoundly negative impact on social, behavioral, emotional, and neurological development. "Trauma-informed care" includes assessing for adverse childhood experiences and reframing clients' subsequent "symptoms" and struggles as the inevitable by-products and coping strategies of attachment trauma. However, I am concerned that a newer version of attachment trauma has invaded even the most "loving" families. Our reliance on, and, in some cases addiction to, digital gadgets and technology has hijacked the face-to-face parent-child interactions that are necessary for consistent, sustained and secure attachment. Is this scenario familiar? After standing in line at the post office for fifteen minutes - a somewhat inherently traumatic... ...

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Bayer Monsanto faces a second trial over Roundup causing cancer

Bayer AG on Monday faced a second U.S. jury over allegations that its popular glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup causes cancer, six months after the company's share price was rocked by a $289 million verdict in California state court. The lawsuit by California resident Edwin Hardeman against the company began on Monday morning in federal rather than state court. The trial is also a test case for a larger litigation. More than 760 of the 9,300 Roundup cases nationwide are consolidated in the federal court in San Francisco that is hearing Hardeman's case. Bayer denies all allegations that Roundup or glyphosate cause cancer, specifically non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, saying decades of independent studies have shown the world's most widely used weed killer to be safe for human use and noting that regulators around the world have approved the product. During the first phase...

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Jordan Peterson on Art, Mythology, Fame and Education

Jordan Peterson joins Tyler to discuss collecting Soviet propaganda, why he's so drawn to Jung, what the Exodus story can teach us about current events, his marriage and fame, what the Intellectual Dark Web gets wrong, immigration in America and Canada, his tendency towards depression, Tinder's revolutionary nature, the lessons from The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter, fixing universities, the skills needed to become a good educator, and much more. Listen to the full conversation ...

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Autism diagnoses in Northern Ireland children up by more than 100% in 5 years

The number of children being diagnosed with autism in Northern Ireland has more than doubled in five years. Some health trusts have seen a three-fold increase and there are also 2,500 under-18s still waiting to be assessed. Healthcare professionals and autism charities have pointed to increased awareness as a reason for the jump. Kerry Boyd, the head of Autism NI, said her organisation is "inundated" with requests for support. ...

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Food as medicine: Mushrooms for longevity

The idea of "food as medicine" may be a bit hard to swallow, especially if you have a gourmand's palate. What if you could fight a host of diseases and even increase your longevity, just by adding a few delicious servings of fungus to your diet every day? Paul Stamets, renowned mycologist (that's a mushroom expert) and TedTalk favorite, fervently believes that mushrooms can save the world. He describes fungi as "the grand molecular disassemblers of nature" due to their transformative ability to generate humus soils from decomposing organic materials. Fungi turn the decay of nature into nutrients for plants, trees, animals, and humans alike. As part of this amazing dance of biosynthesis, mushrooms alchemize Earth's most powerful elements for the benefit of mankind. Fungi produce our best antibiotics, and have medicinal potential for a host of diseases. Certain varieties...

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Do Not Disturb: How I ditched my phone and unbroke my brain

My name is Kevin, and I have a phone problem. And if you're anything like me - and the statistics suggest you probably are, at least where smartphones are concerned - you have one, too. I don't love referring to what we have as an "addiction." That seems too sterile and clinical to describe what's happening to our brains in the smartphone era. Unlike alcohol or opioids, phones aren't an addictive substance so much as a species-level environmental shock. We might someday evolve the correct biological hardware to live in harmony with portable supercomputers that satisfy our every need and connect us to infinite amounts of stimulation. But for most of us, it hasn't happened yet. ...

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We have weaker bones than our hunter-gatherer ancestors – this is what you can do about it

Technology is continuously advancing to make our lives "easier", more efficient and often more sedentary. All of this has an impact on our body and, specifically, our bones. Loss of bone strength is one of the least talked about risks of sedentary lifestyles, but is arguably one of the most important, with osteoporosis related fractures occurring in one in three women and one in five men. There is a direct relationship between the lack of oestrogen after menopause and the development of osteoporosis. As a society, we are more sedentary than ever before. The use of transport, electric rather than manual bikes, and having our weekly grocery shopping ordered online and delivered to the comfort of our homes are all at odds with keeping active. Children in particular are less active - with computer games replacing "playing out" during a...

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