Actions to take when you dislike yourself and your life

Most of us have experienced that pivotal peak of pain, anger or frustration in which we want to scream “I hate my life.” Yet, the feeling that a dark cloud has specifically settled over us and our experiences can feel pretty isolating. The truth is, no matter how singled out or overwhelmed we feel, and no matter what area we are struggling in, we are not alone. More than half of U.S. workers are unhappy with their job. One in 10 Americans struggles with depression. All of us have moments of utter despair. Escaping from this hopeless-seeming state may feel impossible. Yet, in reality, we are not doomed, and we are not powerless. No matter what our circumstances, we can all learn tools to help us emerge from the darkest moments in our lives. In his 35 years of research, Dr. Salvatore Maddi of The Hardiness Institute has discovered that what predicts how well we will do in life, our relationships, careers, and so on is NOT how much money we have or even how many struggles we face….

Melinda Gates slams social media for spreading ‘disinfo’

In a September 2020 interview with Axios on HBO, Melinda Gates said “It may be time for a reckoning” with social media’s role in spreading disinformation. According to Axios:1 Bill and Melinda Gates … [have] seen firsthand the impact of disinformation, as they’ve become targets of conspiracy theories amplified and spread via social media … [Melinda] Gates … said society may need to start holding social media companies to account for their role in helping such disinformation spread. It’s ironic, to say the least, considering the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funds and influences mainstream media companies, which in turn write whatever the Gates desire, be it truthful or not, without disclosing their conflict of interest.

Extraordinary cases of children remembering their past lives and proving it

Reincarnation is a fascinating subject that has remained on the fringe of scientific study for too long. Fortunately, it has recently begun to attract serious interest from the scientific community. Decades ago, American astronomer and astrobiologist Carl Sagan stated that “there are three claims in the [parapsychology] field which, in my opinion, deserve serious study,” with one being “that young children sometimes report details of a previous life, which upon checking turn out to be accurate and which they could not have known about in any other way than reincarnation.” Fast forward to today, and amazing discoveries have been made, as multiple researchers have taken it upon themselves to study this intriguing and inexplicable — at least from a materialist scientific worldview — phenomenon. Subjects like reincarnation belong to the non-material sciences, an area of research that deserves more attention. As Nikola Tesla himself said, “the day science begins to study non-physical…

SOTT FOCUS: Objective:Health: – Whistleblowers: Modern Day Heroes of Truth‌

Whistleblowers have become an integral part of the modern cultural landscape, giving us insider information, exposing corruption and giving us a peak behind the impenetrable curtain the powers that be hold up to the cameras, keeping us all in the accepted narrative. In the past few months, more and more whistleblowers from multiple agencies, tech companies and academia have come forward, giving us invaluable information into the workings and machinations of the Orwellian apparatus. Are they all legit? What is implied by what we’re being told? And why do so many people either ignore or normalize the revelations? Join us on this episode of Objective:Health as we look into many of these recent revelations. And check us out on Brighteon and lbry.tv! For other health-related news and more, you can find us on: ♥Twitter: https://twitter.com/objecthealth ♥Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/objecthealth/ ♥Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channel/objectivehealth ♥And you can check out…

Amoeba found in soil kills elderly gardener, liquefies brain

An elderly gardener died from a brain-eating amoeba found in soil after it turned part of his frontal lobe into a mushy liquid, according to researchers in Georgia. The 82-year-old man is believed to have contracted the shape-shifting organism while potting plants at an unnamed location, and was later struck by seizures, according to a case study, which was published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The man was first treated for bacterial, fungal and viral meningitis before becoming drowsy and suffering seizures, researchers from Emory University in Atlanta said in the report. He died nine days after being admitted to a hospital.

Estimate of COVID-19 seroprevalence in the US suggests few in the population developed antibodies in the first wave

Researchers from Stanford University explain that patients on dialysis represent an important population to study general COVID-19 seroprevalence. These patients already undergo routine, monthly laboratory studies and represent similar risk factors to contracting COVID-19 as the general population, including age, non-white race, and poverty. Unlike community-based surveys, where a select group may show up for or agree to be tested and require a significant on-the-ground effort to launch, patients on dialysis are amenable to random sampling as part of their routine care. The study follows previous findings from recent seroprevalence studies of highly affected countries and regions (e.g. Wuhan, China, and Spain), which have shown that despite the intense strain on resources and unprecedented excess mortality, rates of seroprevalence at the population level remain low. Other seroprevalence studies of the U.S. population have been restricted to regional hotspots, such as New York City….

Personality traits are associated with cognitive resilience in older adults

Our aging brains collect tangles and sticky plaques that can interfere in our cognition and memory. But some older adults with this neuropathology have more cognitive resilience than others, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. The reason: their personalities. Personality traits were associated with cognitive resilience, which is the ability to better live with the neuropathology in the brain that causes dementia. Individuals with a greater tendency toward self-discipline, organization, diligence, high achievement and motivation — a trait known as higher conscientiousness — were associated with greater resilience.

BEST OF THE WEB: What you need to know about the Act of 1986: Interview with Dr. Andrew Wakefield

In this interview, Dr. Andrew Wakefield discusses the documentary1 “1986: The Act,” which he produced. He also co-wrote and directed Del Bigtree’s film “Vaxxed,” which discloses the conspiracy within the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to withhold information about vaccine harms. Wakefield is now doing a tour promoting “1986: The Act,” which is the best documentary I’ve ever seen on this topic. It’s also one of two full-feature films included in the ticket price for the National Vaccine Information Center’s international public conference on vaccination,2 which will be held online October 16 through 18, 2020. If you haven’t signed up for that event yet, I encourage you to do that now. If you want to watch the film now, it’s available online at 1986theact.com. A trailer is provided at the end of this article.

Astrocytes may hold the key to why, how we sleep

Spokane, Wash. – A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons, the brain’s nerve cells. Led by researchers at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, the study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and neurological diseases and other conditions associated with troubled sleep, such as PTSD, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and autism spectrum disorder. “What we know about sleep has been based largely on neurons,” said lead author and postdoctoral research associate Ashley Ingiosi. Neurons, she explained, communicate through electrical signals that can be readily captured through electroencephalography (EEG). Astrocytes — a type of glial (or “glue”) cell that…

SOTT FOCUS: MindMatters: Ibn ‘Arabi’s Alchemy of Human Happiness: Interview with Stephen Hirtenstein

The philosophy and practice of alchemy, in one form or another, has been around for millennia and espoused by many different cultures, the idea centering around the chemical and physical transformation of some common ore to its highest most valuable state, gold. Modern chemistry naturally discounts this view as outdated and simply not true. But what if that is to miss the point? What if the true alchemical process has little to do with base and precious metals and everything to do man’s inner state of being – and the state of his soul? One of the most important sections of Ibn Arabi’s prolific Futūḥāt, the 167th chapter called ‘The Alchemy of Human Happiness’, focuses on this very subject. Joining us this week on MindMatters we again have the opportunity to discuss the wisdom of the Sufi master Ibn Arabi with Prof Stephen Hirtenstein and his own translation from the original Arabic of the chapter in question. Can self-perfection bring happiness? Are there paths by which this…