Research shows that BSers are more likely to fall for BS

People who frequently try to impress or persuade others with misleading exaggerations and distortions are themselves more likely to be fooled by impressive-sounding misinformation, new research from the University of Waterloo shows. The researchers found that people who frequently engage in “persuasive bullshitting” were actually quite poor at identifying it. Specifically, they had trouble distinguishing intentionally profound or scientifically accurate fact from impressive but meaningless fiction. Importantly, these frequent BSers are also much more likely to fall for fake news headlines. Shane Littrell, lead author of the paper and cognitive psychology Ph.D. candidate at Waterloo, stated: “It probably seems intuitive to believe that you can’t bullshit a bullshitter, but our research suggests that this isn’t actually the case. In fact, it appears that the biggest purveyors of persuasive bullshit are ironically some of the ones most likely to fall for it.” The researchers define…