NHS warns against Gwyneth Paltrow’s ‘kombucha and kimchi’ Covid advice

Hollywood actor urged to stop spreading misinformation after promoting ‘intuitive fasting’. Gwyneth Paltrow has been urged to stop spreading misinformation by the medical director of NHS England after she suggested long Covid could be treated with “intuitive fasting”, herbal cocktails and regular visits to an “infrared sauna”. The Hollywood star, who markets unproven new age potions on her Goop website, wrote on her latest blogpost that she caught Covid-19 early and had since suffered “long-tail fatigue and brain fog”.

Medical Reversals

I’ve been asked why I’m so skeptical when it comes to health and medical science. My answer is because I’ve spent many hours studying medical history, and I’ve seen how much damage doctors have done over the centuries. If you were to select a patient-doctor consultation at random from all the ones that have happened throughout history, your odds are probably better of selecting one in which the doctor harmed the patient than one in which the doctor helped the patient. That is certainly true if you only look at consultations happening before the year 1900. It’s a shame that medical history generally isn’t part of the curriculum in medical school. If it was, maybe doctors would be more humble about what they know, and what they don’t know. If I were to design a medical school curriculum, I would make the first five to ten weeks of medical school an in-depth course in medical history, with a particular focus on all the mistakes doctors and scientists have made through the centuries,…

Amid COVID-19 pandemic, flu has disappeared in the US

February is usually the peak of flu season, with doctors’ offices and hospitals packed with suffering patients. But not this year. Flu has virtually disappeared from the U.S., with reports coming in at far lower levels than anything seen in decades. Experts say that measures put in place to fend off the coronavirus — mask wearing, social distancing and virtual schooling — were a big factor in preventing a “twindemic” of flu and COVID-19. A push to get more people vaccinated against flu probably helped, too, as did fewer people traveling, they say. Another possible explanation: The coronavirus has essentially muscled aside flu and other bugs that are more common in the fall and winter. Scientists don’t fully understand the mechanism behind that, but it would be consistent with patterns seen when certain flu strains predominate over others, said Dr. Arnold Monto, a flu expert at the University of Michigan. Nationally, “this is the lowest flu season we’ve had on record,” according to…

Oxford-AstraZeneca eugenics links – James Corbett interviews Whitney Webb

Even some in the independent media have bought into the hype surrounding the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID vaccine and its “non-profit” nature. But once you peel back the layers of obfuscation you quickly find not only the profit motive hiding underneath, but the dark specter of eugenics. Whitney Webb of Unlimited Hangout joins us to discuss her recent article, “Developers of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine Tied to UK Eugenics Movement.”

‘Papers, please’: Vaccine Passports have officially arrived

For a weary public longing to get back to normalcy, vaccine passports represent a tantalizing carrot, being dangled as a mechanism for freedom. By showing proof that you’ve received a COVID-19 vaccine, perhaps you can once again board an airplane and travel freely, attend a concert or enjoy a meal in your favorite restaurant, just like you used to. Except, being required to present your “papers” in order to live your life isn’t actually freedom at all — it’s discrimination, and even a move toward technocratic fascism, one that’s setting the stage for increased surveillance and erosion of your privacy. Nonetheless, this blatant move toward an ever-increasing surveillance state is being welcomed by many who have been led to believe the passports are necessary to protect public health and safety.

Flesh-eating ulcer spreads to inner Melbourne suburbs

A flesh-eating disease affecting parts of coastal Victoria has spread to inland Melbourne for the first time, with several cases reported in Essendon, Moonee Ponds and Brunswick West. Victorian Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton said on Tuesday that the risk of acquiring the ulcer in those areas was considered low, but “this is the first non-coastal area in Victoria to be recognised as a potential area of risk”. “A genetic analysis of bacteria isolated from these people as part of a research project suggests a common source of infection in the area,” Professor Sutton said in a health advisory issued to medicos and residents on Tuesday.

How childhood infections can provide protection against future pandemics

A child’s first influenza infection shapes their immunity to future airborne flu viruses — including emerging pandemic strains. But not all flu strains spur the same initial immune defense, according to new findings published today by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine virologists in the journal PLOS Pathogens. “These results are relevant right now to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said senior author Seema Lakdawala, Ph.D., assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at Pitt. “They may explain age-based distributions of SARS-CoV-2 disease severity and susceptibility. “Having flu once does not make you immune to all future influenza viruses,” she said. “Nor does having had the original SARS virus in 2003 or any of the ‘common cold’ coronaviruses in circulation necessarily mean you can’t get infected with SARS-CoV-2. But your susceptibility to infection might be different than someone who has never encountered a coronavirus.”

Psychological ‘signature’ for the extremist mind uncovered by Cambridge researchers

Researchers have mapped an underlying “psychological signature” for people who are predisposed to holding extreme social, political or religious attitudes, and support violence in the name of ideology. A new study suggests that a particular mix of personality traits and unconscious cognition – the ways our brains take in basic information – is a strong predictor for extremist views across a range of beliefs, including nationalism and religious fervour. These mental characteristics include poorer working memory and slower “perceptual strategies” – the unconscious processing of changing stimuli, such as shape and colour – as well as tendencies towards impulsivity and sensation seeking. This combination of cognitive and emotional attributes predicts the endorsement of violence in support of a person’s ideological “group”, according to findings published today in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. The study also maps the psychological signatures that underpin fierce…

COVID-19 appears to be dying off. Was this the plan? [Video]

The video clip shows the only nation to have reported the drop in the last month was India. Something to think about. Hear much about COVID-19 lately? Sure you do, you think. We hear about vaccinations taking place and all manner of furor about whether the vaccine is any good, or if it is a mind-control drug or some fiercely dangerous compound that kills more people than the virus it is supposed to protect everybody from. In the United States, the ferocity of this argument appears to be fierce, while in Russia it is quiet. Life goes on, at least in Russia, with businesses beginning to run “as usual” once again. But have you heard much about COVID-19 itself, lately? That is the question here. The answer is probably “no.”

New bird flu strain H5N8 detected in humans, 7 poultry workers in Southern Russia were infected

A new strain of avian flu, similar to the infectious virus that has triggered past pandemic fears, has been discovered by scientists in Russia after an outbreak of a previously unknown disease in the country’s south. On Saturday, Anna Popova, the head of health watchdog Rospotrebnadzor told journalists that experts at the Vector Institute in Siberia had “isolated genetic material” from a new influenza variant. The samples they tested came from seven employees of a poultry farm in southern Russia, which registered a bird flu outbreak in December last year.