31 dead in DR Congo bubonic plague outbreak

Thirty-one people have died in an outbreak of plague that erupted in northeastern DR Congo three months ago, health officials and experts said on Friday. “We have more than 520 cases… of which more than 31 have been fatal,” Patrick Karamura, health minister in Ituri province, where plague is endemic, told AFP. The cases are the bubonic form of the disease, except for five cases of pneumonic plague and two of septicaemic plague, he said.

Is moderate alcohol consumption really healthy?

I’m going to start this article by revealing my own biases. I’m not sure where the idea that alcohol might be healthy comes from. It’s pretty well established that alcohol is poisonous to all living organisms. That’s why we use it to disinfect surfaces, and why I lather my hands in it several times per hour when I’m working in the hospital. It interferes with the functioning of cell membranes, and at high enough doses it causes the cell membranes to fall apart completely, killing the immersed organisms. That’s the reason it is such an effective disinfectant. It doesn’t take a great leap to think that something that interferes with the functioning of our cell membranes might not be too good for us. As an interesting aside, the alcohol disinfectant I use to rub my hands in at work is perfectly drinkable, if you’re desperate enough. Which is why the nurses generally remove all the disinfectant containers from the patient’s room if they know the patient has an alcohol addiction….

Scientists ‘talk’ to sleeping people by invading their dreams

Scientists have successfully “talked” to a sleeping person in real-time by invading their dreams, a new study shows. The researchers say it’s like trying to communicate with an astronaut on another world. Dreamers can follow instructions, solve simple math problems and answer yes-no questions without ever waking up, according to the results of four experiments described Thursday (Feb. 18) in the journal Current Biology. The researchers communicated directly with sleeping participants by asking them questions and having them respond with eye or facial movements during lucid dreams — when people are at minimum aware that they are dreaming. (Some lucid dreamers can control what happens in their dreams.) “You might expect that if you were to try to communicate with somebody who was asleep, they just wouldn’t answer,” study first author Karen Konkoly, a cognitive neuroscientist at Northwestern University in Illinois, told Live Science. Although Konkoly hoped the real-time communication…

SOTT FOCUS: What Moderna isn’t telling us about their new mRNA COVID-19 vaccine

After my review of the Pfizer/BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 virus vaccine, I was regularly asked if I would do the same for the Moderna vaccine. I will do that in this blog. Regarding a discussion of the study into the efficacy and safety of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, I refer you to one of my previous blogs: https://www.janbhommel.com/post/het-pfizer-biontech-vaccin-tegen-het-sars-cov-2-virus Comment: See here for the English translation of his blog on the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine: What Pfizer/BioNTech isn’t telling us about the new mRNA COVID-19 vaccine The study into efficacy and safety of the Moderna vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 virus was published on December 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) (1). This study shows great similarities to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine efficacy and safety study, however there are some differences. Overall, the Moderna study makes a better impression than the Pfizer/BioNTech study, as I will discuss below.

How deadly is COVID19? – Infection vs case fatalities

I have spent large chunks of my life trying to untangle medial data and research. COVID19 has long since defeated me. I have been unable to make any sense of the information we are bombarded with daily. So, I decided to go back to basics. At the start of the COVID19 saga, I was interested to know what the infection fatality rate (IFR) was likely to be. I felt I could then have a go at comparing it to other diseases, primarily influenza. The infection fatality is the number of people infected with the virus who then die. This is very different to the case fatality rate (CFR), which is the number of people infected with the disease who become unwell enough (sometimes, but not always) to be admitted to hospital – the ‘cases’. Who then die. Before COVID19 appeared, there used to be a reasonably clear distinction between the infection fatality rate (IFR), and the case fatality fate (CFR) and it is important that they should not get mixed up. Because the case fatality rate is almost…

Sheba researcher: Antiparasitic drug ivermectin reduces length of COVID-19 infection

An Israeli tropical-disease expert says he has new proof that a drug used to fight parasites in third-world countries could help reduce the length of infection for people who contract coronavirus. Prof. Eli Schwartz, founder of the Center for Travel Medicine and Tropical Disease at Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer, last week completed a clinical trial of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug ivermectin, a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent that has also been shown to fight viruses. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study included 100 people with mild to moderate cases of the disease who were not hospitalized for the virus. It tested whether ivermectin could shorten the viral shedding period, allowing them to test negative for coronavirus and leave isolation in only a few days. According to his still unpublished data, Schwartz said the drug was shown to help “cure” people of the virus within just six days. Moreover, the chances of testing negative for coronavirus…

As scientists study safety of tattoo ink, Europe bans two widely used pigments

Tattoo artists in Europe are fighting a new ban on two commonly-used green and blue pigments, saying that losing these ink ingredients would be a disaster for their industry and their art. Meanwhile, in the United States, where about a third of Americans have a tattoo, tattoo ink is almost completely unregulated and there’s little known about what’s in tattoo ink. Some artists here say the European restrictions don’t make any sense.

All virus origin hypotheses open: WHO

All hypotheses are still open in the World Health Organisation’s search for the origins of COVID-19, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has told a briefing. A WHO-led mission in China said this week that it was not looking further into the question of whether the virus escaped from a lab, which it considered highly unlikely. Comment: See: Cover-up: WHO expert says coronavirus leak from Chinese lab unlikely, most probably jumped to human via intermediary species The United States government has said it will review the mission’s findings.

Big Pharma’s COVID vaccine

The following text is Chapter VII of Prof Michel Chossudovsky’s E-Book entitled: The 2020 Worldwide Corona Crisis: Destroying Civil Society, Engineered Economic Depression, Global Coup d’État and the “Great Reset” , (December 2020, revised January 2021) click the above link to access the complete E-book consisting of a Preface, Highlights and Nine Chapters. Introduction The plan to develop the Covid-19 vaccine is profit driven. The US government had already ordered 100 million doses back in July 2020 and the EU is to purchase 300 million doses. It’s Big Money for Big Pharma, generous payoffs to corrupt politicians, at the expense of tax payers. The objective is ultimately to make money, by vaccinating the entire planet of 7.8 billion people for SARS-CoV-2. The Covid vaccine in some cases envisages more than one shot. If this initiative were to go ahead as planned, it would be the largest vaccine project in World history and the biggest money making operation for Big Pharma. The…

Women better at reading minds than men says new study

A new approach to ‘mind-reading’ has been developed by researchers at the University of Bath, Cardiff, and London to improve how well we understand what others are thinking. And it transpires that women are much better than men at putting themselves in someone else’s shoes. Mind-reading, sometimes referred to in psychology as ‘mentalising’, is an important ability enabling us to pick-up on subtle behavioural cues that might indicate that someone we are speaking to is thinking something that they are not saying (e.g. being sarcastic or even lying). The researchers say that we all have different mind-reading abilities, with some of us inherently better than others. The fact that not all of us are good at mind-reading can cause challenges – in particular for people with autism where it can lead to social struggles in building or maintaining relationships. To identify those people who have difficulties and to provide them with appropriate support, the team at Bath designed a new…