Why does it feel good to see someone fail?

In the Pixar animated film "Inside Out," most of the plot plays out inside protagonist Riley's head, where five emotions - Joy, Sadness, Fear, Disgust and Anger - direct her behavior. The film was released to glowing reviews. But director Pete Docter later admitted that he always regretted that one emotion didn't make the cut: Schadenfreude. Schadenfreude, which literally means "harm joy" in German, is the peculiar pleasure people derive from others' misfortune. You might feel it when the career of a high-profile celebrity craters, when a particularly noxious criminal is locked up or when a rival sporting team gets vanquished. Psychologists have long struggled with how to best understand, explain and study the emotion: It arises in such a wide range of situations that it can seem almost impossible to come up with some sort of unifying framework. Yet...

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Shocker: Vegans ‘take twice as many sick days’ as meat eating colleagues, report says

Vegans take the most sick days off work due to cold, flu and minor ailments, according to a new report. The study found that they are absent through illness for almost five days a year, which is twice the annual total of the average Briton. And while the reasons for the high sick-day count are unclear, two-thirds of vegans admitted to taking more time off work due to minor illness in 2018 than in previous years. ...

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SOTT FOCUS: The Truth Perspective: You University: The Value and Art of Self-Education

It starts with a question. How does a car actually work? How can I lose weight and keep it off? What are UFOs? What could I accomplish if I really applied myself? Our curiosity is peaked and we want to know more, but we're not quite sure where to start. If there's no formal education course we can take that has a syllabus all laid out, then what do we do? How do we create a plan that will guide us toward finding answers to our questions and reaching our goals? Today on the Truth Perspective we discuss "The Science of Self-Learning" by Peter Hollins: how his practical advice for self-learning can be applied to multiple dimensions of personal development, and why self-education is so important. The difference between the reading and regurgitation that is common in schools and real...

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The great cholesterol deception

Millions of Australians are prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs - statins like Pravachol®, Zocor® and Lipitor® - each year at a cost of more than $1 billion dollars with very little, if any, benefit. In the US, some 40 million people currently take statins at a cost of more than $3.00 per pill, more than $1,000 per year, totalling more than $40 billion a year. While there are many exaggerated claims and a lot of hype about the benefits of statins, there are also many studies showing no benefits at all. The pro-statin hype is based on the misuse and abuse of statistics. Various independent studies in prestigious, peer-reviewed journals have shown that statin use in primary prevention - that is, to save lives - has minimal or no value in reducing mortality and certainly nothing that is considered anywhere near clinically...

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How to go on a low-information diet

Disconnecting completely isn't a realistic option, so here's how to trim back on the daily deluge. We live in a world of unlimited information. The internet produces 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every single day. Keeping up everything is impossible when we only have 24 hours in a day, and can stand in the way of getting things done and focusing on what really matters. Anita Williams Woolley, associate professor of organizational behavior and theory at Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business, says the biggest problem with information overload is the constant stream of interruptions. "Doing something such as writing an email while being constantly interrupted can lead you to spend at least twice as long writing it, and the quality of the final product will be significantly lower than if it was written without interruptions," she says. ...

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Science has debunked the link between video games and real violence

In a recent column, Jack Thompson argues that mass shootings might be deterred by enacting government regulation of violent video games. Thompson argues this would be "simple, constitutional and effective." I am one of the leading researchers on the effects of violent games and testified before the School Safety Commission Thompson mentions. The U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled any government regulation of violent video games to be unconstitutional. Furthermore, evidence is now clear any regulation would be entirely ineffective at reducing criminal violence. During my testimony before the School Safety Commission, I noted that research evidence has not, in fact, supported links between violent video games and mass shootings or any other criminal violence. Even for minor acts of aggression, such as putting spicy sauce in someone's food as a prank, the evidence is inconsistent. For actual acts of...

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Vaccine shot killed famed cancer doctor in minutes from “total organ failure”, state-run media desperately tries to cover it up

Dr. Martin Gore, a widely celebrated cancer doctor credited with "saving thousands of lives" died from "total organ failure" just minutes after receiving a vaccine shot yesterday. Dr. Gore was a professor of cancer medicine at the Institute of Cancer Research based in London. He "died suddenly yesterday after a routine inoculation for yellow fever," reports The Times (UK). "His death highlights the increased risks associated with the vaccine for the growing number of older travellers visiting exotic destinations," the paper explains. It also underscores the horrific price of believing in Big Pharma, chemotherapy and vaccines. Throughout his career, Dr. Gore oversaw the harming of tens of thousands of children who were subjected to toxic chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Ultimately, he was killed by his own false belief in the safety of vaccines, another weaponized form of toxic medicine. Live...

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An alternative to the APA’s new sexist guidelines for working with men and boys

The APA's Division 51 (Men and Masculinities) recently released their guidelines for working with men and boys. While guidelines on this topic are much needed, the APA's contribution leaves room for improvement. In this article I will outline issues with two of their 10 guidelines: Guideline 1 of the APA guidelines suggests that "masculinities are constructed based on social, cultural and contextual norms". However although it is true that masculinity is, in part, constructed, it is also partly innate. What is the evidence that masculinity is, in part, innate? Well, sex differences in cognition and behaviour are found worldwide, and their universality suggests something that transcends culture. Moreover, most of these clearly map onto masculinity. For example, the tendency to being more competitive, aggressive (physically), and interested in sports than women maps onto the male gender script of being a...

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Aprende a sufrir para sufrir menos

Las personas siempre intentamos construirnos una vida segura y tranquila donde queden excluidos los riesgos y por supuesto, el sufrimiento. Hay quien va más allá de este simple principio y, por miedo a sufrir o a experimentar cualquier emoción negativa, se olvida precisamente de vivir. No hace mucho te hablamos por ejemplo de algo muy común que está ocurriendo hoy en día, personas que tras sufrir un desengaño amoroso, una traición o una pérdida, elige incluso el "no volver a enamorarse". Se cierra puertas y, en cierto modo prescinde el vivir una parte de esa vida tan importante para el ser humano. Pero ahora bien, cada uno de nosotros somos libres para tomar nuestras propias decisiones y el modo en que deseamos pasar nuestros días, sin ser juzgados o criticados. Con esto, solo queremos dejar claro un aspecto. No podemos...

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BEST OF THE WEB: Damning: US Justice Dept. fired chief medical expert after he privately told their lawyers vaccines can cause autism

Today we investigate one of the biggest medical controversies of our time: vaccines. There's little dispute about this much-- vaccines save many lives, and rarely, they injure or kill. A special federal vaccine court has paid out billions for injuries from brain damage to death. But not for the form of brain injury we call autism. Now-we have remarkable new information: a respected pro-vaccine medical expert used by the federal government to debunk the vaccine-autism link, says vaccines can cause autism after all. He claims he told that to government officials long ago, but they kept it secret. Yates Hazlehurst was born February 11, 2000. Everything was normal, according to his medical records, until he suffered a severe reaction to vaccinations. Rolf Hazlehurst is Yates' dad. Rolf Hazlehurst: And at first, I didn't believe it. I did not think that,...

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