How dealing with past trauma may be the key to breaking addiction

Opening up to past trauma is difficult, but self-awareness is key to addressing issues that leave us vulnerable What's your poison, people sometimes ask, but Gabor Maté doesn't want to ask what my poison is, he wants to ask how it makes me feel. Whatever it is I'm addicted to, or ever have been addicted to, it's not what it is but what it does - to me, to you, to anyone. He believes that anything we've ever craved helped us escape emotional pain. It gave us peace of mind, a sense of control and a feeling of happiness. And all of that, explains Maté, reveals a great deal about addiction, which he defines as any behaviour that gives a person temporary relief and pleasure, but also has negative consequences, and to which the individual will return time and again....

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SOTT FOCUS: The Truth Perspective: How To Survive A Totalitarian Nightmare: The Psychology Of Tyranny

What is it like to live in a country with a brutal, totalitarian government? According to Dr. Andrew Lobaczewski, the only way to truly know is to actually experience it. Literary accounts and news reports can provide some data, but even that will only be theoretical. Actually experiencing it is something else entirely: a punch in the gut that can cause anxiety, depression, and PTSD. But there's one other way to get an idea: a first-hand experience with malevolence at the hands of someone with a sever personality disorder. Today on the Truth Perspective we discuss chapter 6 of Lobaczewski's book Political Ponerology: "Normal People Under Pathocratic Rule". The reason people who have lived with a pathological individual know what it's like to live under a pathocracy is because the two experiences are analogous: they both involve personality-disordered individuals in...

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Electrical stimulation of the brain can ‘significantly’ improve mood, depression

New research shows that deep brain stimulation can tackle treatment-resistant depression. Stimulating a brain area called the orbitofrontal cortex led to "significant" improvements in mood for people with moderate to severe depression. Major depressive disorder affects over 16 million adults per year in the United States and is the "leading cause of disability worldwide." A significant proportion of people who are living with major depression do not get any relief from existing treatments. In fact, up to 30 percent of those affected by depression have an intractable form of the condition. Recently, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a potential therapy that may succeed where other treatments have failed. In DBS, specialists surgically implant stimulating electrodes in the brain to send electrical currents to targeted areas. ...

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Children who start school a year early more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD, study shows

Could a child's birthday put them at risk for an ADHD misdiagnosis? The answer appears to be yes, at least among children born in August who start school in states with a Sept. 1 cutoff enrollment date, according to a new study led by Harvard Medical School researchers. The findings, published Nov. 28 in The New England Journal of Medicine, show that children born in August in those states are 30 percent more likely to receive an ADHD diagnosis, compared with their slightly older peers enrolled in the same grade. The rate of ADHD diagnoses among children has risen dramatically over the past 20 years. In 2016 alone, more than 5 percent of U.S. children were being actively treated with medication for ADHD. Experts believe the rise is fueled by a combination of factors, including a greater recognition of the...

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Fearing fear itself

Once parents felt children needed a little fear to grow up well. Today they are desperately protective. What went wrong? How much fear, anxiety and risk can children handle? Until the late 19th century, most people thought that the answer was quite a lot. Aristotle himself said that education might be defined as teaching us to fear aright. It was widely believed that a sense of fear made a positive contribution to the formation of a child's character. That fear was regarded as essential for the education of children was spelled out by the Church Missionary Society in 1819, when it stated that 'it is necessary, that children fear the Schoolmasters'. Children's experience of fear was sometimes portrayed as essential for developing their powers of imagination and creativity. For example in 1848, the Christian Register advised parents that a 'child...

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