Study raises questions about gluten, lactose in drugs

Washington - A man with celiac disease felt sicker after starting a new drug, but it wasn't a typical side effect. It turns out the pills were mixed with gluten the patient knew to avoid in food - but was surprised to find hiding in medicine. A new report says pills often contain so-called "inactive" ingredients capable of causing allergic or gastrointestinal reactions in small numbers of people sensitive to specific compounds. And it's hard for those patients, or even their doctors, to tell if a pill contains an extra ingredient they should avoid, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital said Wednesday. When the doctor sends a prescription, the pharmacist issues whatever the person's insurance covers - without discussion of inactive ingredients that are buried in the drug's labeling. "There's a tremendous underappreciation...

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SOTT FOCUS: The Truth Perspective: The Hidden Role of Psi in Psychotherapy – and Evolution?

Dr. Jim Carpenter's First Sight theory not only finds a role for psi in the creation of consciousness; it has a wide range of implications for what it means to be human, the nature of personal development, and potentially the development of life itself. With its focus on the importance of meaning, it has particular relevance to the practice of psychotherapy. Today on the Truth Perspective we discuss a chapter in Carpenter's book on the subject, as well as a talk he gave in which he expands on the ideas presented there. Carpenter compares his theory with the Control/Mastery theory of psychotherapy, in which conscious and unconscious motivations play a central role. Last week we asked how to bring unconscious and conscious intentions into alignment. Carpenter's discussion of pathogenic beliefs and the role of the therapist in correcting them provides...

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How Inuit parents teach kids to control their anger

Back in the 1960s, a Harvard graduate student made a landmark discovery about the nature of human anger. At age 34, Jean Briggs traveled above the Arctic Circle and lived out on the tundra for 17 months. There were no roads, no heating systems, no grocery stores. Winter temperatures could easily dip below minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Briggs persuaded an Inuit family to "adopt" her and "try to keep her alive," as the anthropologist wrote in 1970. At the time, many Inuit families lived similar to the way their ancestors had for thousands of years. They built igloos in the winter and tents in the summer. "And we ate only what the animals provided, such as fish, seal and caribou," says Myna Ishulutak, a film producer and language teacher who lived a similar lifestyle as a young girl. ...

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Health censorship! Amazon bans books related to autism cures and vaccine truth

Amazon is removing books that promote supposed "cures" for autism, the Associated Press reports. It's part of an effort by several big tech companies to cut down on the spread of misinformation about vaccines. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, only medications that can help some function better. Decades of medical research has also consistently shown there is no link between vaccines and autism. Comment: Untrue. One on the CDC's own doctors, William Thompson, blew the whistle on the link between vaccines and autism -- using the CDC's own data -- back in 2014. A spokeswoman for Amazon.com Inc. confirmed the books were no longer available on the site, but did not provide additional information, according to the AP. Last week, fellow tech giant Facebook announced it is cracking down...

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Study: Memories of music cannot be lost to Alzheimer’s and dementia

The part of your brain responsible for ASMR catalogs music, and appears to be a stronghold against Alzheimer's and dementia. Some music inspires you to move your feet, some inspires you to get out there and change the world. In any case, and to move hurriedly on to the point of this article, it's fair to say that music moves people in special ways. If you're especially into a piece of music, your brain does something called Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR), which feels to you like a tingling in your brain or scalp. It's nature's own little "buzz", a natural reward, that is described by some as a "head orgasm". Some even think that it explains why people go to church, for example, "feeling the Lord move through you", but that's another article for another time. ...

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