How Inuit parents teach kids to control their anger

Back in the 1960s, a Harvard graduate student made a landmark discovery about the nature of human anger. At age 34, Jean Briggs traveled above the Arctic Circle and lived out on the tundra for 17 months. There were no roads, no heating systems, no grocery stores. Winter temperatures could easily dip below minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Briggs persuaded an Inuit family to "adopt" her and "try to keep her alive," as the anthropologist wrote in 1970. At the time, many Inuit families lived similar to the way their ancestors had for thousands of years. They built igloos in the winter and tents in the summer. "And we ate only what the animals provided, such as fish, seal and caribou," says Myna Ishulutak, a film producer and language teacher who lived a similar lifestyle as a young girl. ...

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Health censorship! Amazon bans books related to autism cures and vaccine truth

Amazon is removing books that promote supposed "cures" for autism, the Associated Press reports. It's part of an effort by several big tech companies to cut down on the spread of misinformation about vaccines. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, only medications that can help some function better. Decades of medical research has also consistently shown there is no link between vaccines and autism. Comment: Untrue. One on the CDC's own doctors, William Thompson, blew the whistle on the link between vaccines and autism -- using the CDC's own data -- back in 2014. A spokeswoman for Amazon.com Inc. confirmed the books were no longer available on the site, but did not provide additional information, according to the AP. Last week, fellow tech giant Facebook announced it is cracking down...

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Study: Memories of music cannot be lost to Alzheimer’s and dementia

The part of your brain responsible for ASMR catalogs music, and appears to be a stronghold against Alzheimer's and dementia. Some music inspires you to move your feet, some inspires you to get out there and change the world. In any case, and to move hurriedly on to the point of this article, it's fair to say that music moves people in special ways. If you're especially into a piece of music, your brain does something called Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR), which feels to you like a tingling in your brain or scalp. It's nature's own little "buzz", a natural reward, that is described by some as a "head orgasm". Some even think that it explains why people go to church, for example, "feeling the Lord move through you", but that's another article for another time. ...

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Child cancer clinic in Russia accused of infecting over 100 patients with Hepatitis C

A Russian hospital specializing in treating children with cancer stands accused of years of negligence, with over 100 patients reportedly infected with Hepatitis C. Management has denied responsibility. The hospital, which is located in Blagoveshchensk in Russia's Far East, is currently being investigated by federal law enforcement. A probe was launched after parents who claimed their children had been infected filed a complaint. The scandal came to public attention last December, with the reported number of victims growing from a few to 26 to over 100 on Thursday. The latest accusation comes from Kommersant newspaper, which cited one of the parents involved in the case, who asked for anonymity to shield her from possible pressure. "After this got into the press, more parents came up saying their children got infected with Hepatitis C after being treated there. We stopped the...

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Oxford researcher believes there are seven moral rules that unite humanity

In 2012, Oliver Scott Curry was an anthropology lecturer at the University of Oxford. One day, he organized a debate among his students about whether morality was innate or acquired. One side argued passionately that morality was the same everywhere; the other, that morals were different everywhere. "I realized that, obviously, no one really knew, and so decided to find out for myself," Curry says. Seven years later, Curry, now a senior researcher at Oxford's Institute for Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, can offer up an answer to the seemingly ginormous question of what morality is and how it does - or doesn't - vary around the world. Morality, he says, is meant to promote cooperation. "People everywhere face a similar set of social problems, and use a similar set of moral rules to solve them," he says as lead author...

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