Happy Moo-Year: Dairy cows are the new therapy dogs, helping college students de-stress during finals

First, there were therapy dogs in local schools. Then there were yoga goats on local farms. Now, a herd of dairy farm cows has gone back to school - to help college students de-stress before their tests. This month, the Lansing State Journal reported on a new program at Michigan State University allowing students to brush dairy cows to chill out during final exams week. PEOPLE reached out to Andrea Meade, Farm Manager at the Michigan State University Dairy Cattle Teaching and Research Center, to learn more about this unique human-animal bonding experience. She had been looking for ways to get students outside the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources aware of the dairy farm. Meade was also particularly keen on finding "a new way to utilize the herd." "I have been following other trends in agriculture like 'goat yoga'...

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Are people forgetting how to read?

Author of Solitude: A Singular Life in a Crowded World and The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in an Age of Constant Connection. Turning, one evening, from my phone to a book, I set myself the task of reading a single chapter in one sitting. Simple. But I couldn't. There was nothing wrong with my eyes. No stroke or disease clouded my way. Yet - if I'm being honest - the failure was also not a surprise. Paragraphs swirled; sentences snapped like twigs; and sentiments bled out. The usual, these days. I drag my vision across the page and process little. Half an hour later, I throw down the book and watch some Netflix. Out for dinner with another writer, I said, "I think I've forgotten how to read." ...

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Scientific evidence that flu vaccines spread disease: 630% more flu virus particles emitted by people who get vaccinated

A bombshell new scientific study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds that people who receive flu shots emit 630% more flu virus particles into the air, compared to non-vaccinated individuals. In effect, this finding documents evidence that flu vaccines spread the flu, and that so-called "herd immunity" is a medical hoax because "the herd" is actually transformed into carriers and spreaders of influenza. The bombshell finding is documented in a study entitled Infectious virus in exhaled breath of symptomatic seasonal influenza cases from a college community. The study authors are Jing Yan, Michael Grantham, Jovan Pantelic, P. Jacob Bueno de Mesquita, Barbara Albert, Fengjie Liu, Sheryl Ehrman, Donald K. Milton and EMIT Consortium. Details of this bombshell study have been revealed by Sayer Ji at Green Med Info, a site that's rapidly becoming one...

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I Just Can’t Quit You: Video game addiction is real and professionals aren’t prepared to help

Putting down the joystick isn't enough, there's a deeper issue. When José Antonio Hita Ruiz was a teenager, his home life wasn't all that great. His father was an alcoholic, his mother worked too much. In middle school, he was bullied and his grades suffered, so he dropped out. While his friends left his hometown one by one to study at a nearby university, Hita turned even more to video games as an escape, often spending up to 16 hours a day playing strategy games and simulators at his mom's place. "There was a point where I was completely alone," he tells me over Google Hangouts. Now 24, Hita is doing much better. He's doing volunteer work for local nonprofits near Naples, Italy. During our chat, I hear sounds typical of the youth hostel where he's staying - animated chatter,...

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Are memories reliable? Expert explains how they change more than we realize

Your memory probably isn't as good as you think it is. We rely on our memories not only for sharing stories with friends or learning from our past experiences, but we also use it for crucial things like creating a sense of personal identity. Yet evidence shows that our memory isn't as consistent as we'd like to believe. What's worse, we're often guilty of changing the facts and adding false details to our memories without even realising. To understand a bit about how remembering works, consider the "telephone game" (also known as "Chinese whispers"). In the game, one person quietly whispers a message to the person beside them, who then passes it on to the next person in line, and so on. Each time the message is relayed, some parts might be misheard or misunderstood, others might get innocently altered,...

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