If we can learn from anyone – why is it so hard to take advice?

"Ask for money, get advice. Ask for advice, get money twice." - Armando Christian Perez (aka the rapper "Pitbull") One morning in July of 2011, a taxi sat idling outside Petco Park stadium in San Diego, and Wade LeBlanc, struggling pitcher for the Padres, climbed in. "To the airport, please," he told the driver. LeBlanc was headed to Tucson, home of the club's triple-A affiliate. He'd been sent down to the minors. Again. Eight times in the last three years LeBlanc had clawed his way up to the big league only to blow his chance and be sent packing. It was all becoming a cosmic test of character in a career that had started so promisingly, when the Padres drafted him out of college, in 2006, on the strength of his tricky change-up. "You're Wade LeBlanc," the cab driver said.*...

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Diabetes drugs linked to ‘flesh-eating’ genital infection – study

Some newer diabetes drugs have been linked to a nightmarish "flesh-eating" genital disease that can spread rapidly and kill skin tissue as it grows, according to a new study by US Food and Drug Administration scientists. Symptoms of the disease known as 'Fournier gangrene' include pain, redness and a foul odor in the genital area. Alarmingly, the infection starts by attacking your genital or anal region, but can also spread rapidly and kill other body tissue along the way. The rare infection concerns people taking a newer class of diabetes medications known as SGLT2 inhibitors, according to FDA scientists who recently published their findings on the issue. ...

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Glass, germs, and steel: Why Mayor De Blasio’s draconian public health policy will fail

Measles is in the news again. The humble microbe has many faces: scourge of the New World, benign and ubiquitous rite of childhood passage, simultaneous conduit of modern scientific achievement and vexing icon of evasive, unrealized dreams; and most recently, contemporary Rorschach test in the latest American culture war. U.S. measles cases spanning 22 states surged last month to 695 confirmed cases in 2019, marking the highest annual number since the disease was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000. The ongoing outbreak began last fall when infected travelers returned from Israel, Ukraine, and the Philippines, triggering clusters in New York, Washington State, and California - and a concurrent wave of proposed legislation to curtail non-medical exemptions for required childhood immunizations in over a dozen states. As state legislatures considered bills tightening immunization requirements, U.S. Representative Adam Schiff formally requested...

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Four types of grief that are hardly ever discussed

The word grief has come to be understood solely as a reaction to a death. But that narrow understanding fails to encompass the range of human experiences that create and trigger grief. Here are four types of grief that we experience that have nothing to do with death: 1. Loss of identity: A lost role or affiliation. Examples include: A person going through a divorce who feels the loss of no longer being a "spouse." A breast cancer survivor who grieves the lost sense of femininity after a double mastectomy. An empty nester who mourns the lost identity of parenthood in its most direct form. A person who loses their job or switches careers grieves a lost identity. Someone who leaves a religious group feels the loss of affiliation and community. Whenever a person loses a primary identity, they mourn...

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Church of Scientology ship with measles case on board still quarantined in Curacao as blood samples tested; measles patient now healthy

Hundreds of crew members and passengers aboard the Church of Scientology cruise ship Freewinds must remain under quarantine in the Caribbean until blood samples come back negative for measles, a health official in the ship's home port of Curacao told ABC News. The ship, carrying a female crew member who had tested positive for measles but is now healthy, had been quarantined in St. Lucia before arriving in Willemstad, Curacao, Saturday morning, at which point its 216 crew members and 102 passengers were again prevented from disembarking, according to Izzy Gerstenbluth, the head of the Epidemiology and Research Unit at Curacao's Ministry of Health. On Saturday, a team led by Gerstenbluth -- an epidemiologist and public health physician leading Curacao's response -- boarded the ship and spent the day interviewing passengers and crew members. The team gathered documentation from those...

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