New Harvard study confirms there is no gender wage gap – men and women make different choices

"Gender pay gap is worse than thought: Study shows women actually earn half the income of men," NBC announced recently in reference to a report titled "Still a Man's Labor Market" by the Washington-based Institute for Women's Policy Research, which found that women's income was 51 percent less than men's earnings. The "Gender Pay Gap" Isn't What You Think It Is What do you think of when you hear the phrase "gender pay gap"? Perhaps you think of a man and woman who work exactly the same job at exactly the same place, but he gets paid more than she does. This sort of discrimination has been illegal in the United States since the passage of the Equal Pay Act in 1963. But that is not what is generally meant by the phrase "gender wage gap." Instead, the commonly reported...

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High levels of glyphosate discovered in K-12 school breakfast foods across America

A new report by the Center for Environmental Health (CEH) found high levels of the toxic weed killer glyphosate in over 70 percent of the oat-based breakfast foods commonly served in K-12 schools across the U.S.. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide, is applied on farms that grow corn, soybeans, oats, and hundreds of other crops. From there, it can make its way into our food, especially popular breakfast cereals and nutrition bars. CEH tested 13 popular breakfast foods served to school children. The report prioritized school districts with high rates of participation in the National School Breakfast Program since low-income children are already disproportionately exposed to toxic chemicals. Items containing the highest levels of glyphosate include Quaker Maple, Brown Sugar Instant Oatmeal, and Quaker Old-Fashioned Oats. CEH did not find glyphosate residues...

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Erin Brockovich: The weedkiller in our food is killing us

Growing research show that glyphosate, one of the most widely used herbicides in the US, causes cancer On a recent Saturday afternoon, in an estuary near Tampa Bay, Florida, I watched airboats move up and down the river banks, spraying massive plumes of weedkiller on to the vegetation. The state of Florida was trying to control and kill off scores of plant species. Nearby, children were lying out in the sun, though they knew better than to swim in the water, which has recently been blooming with toxic algae. Mists of weedkiller drifted downwind toward them. The main active ingredient in that mist, and in the weedkiller being sprayed throughout Tampa Bay, is glyphosate, one of the most widely used herbicides in the US. First registered for use here in 1974, it is now an ingredient in more than 750...

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Your doctor doesn’t know much about nutrition

There are certain things that doctors are great at. How to prescribe medications? Yes. How to do surgery? Yes. Nutrition and weight loss? No, definitely not. You might be a little stunned to hear that admission, coming from a highly trained medical specialist like myself. But, it all comes down to a physician's training and what they see as their circle of competence. Medical training extends over more than a decade, and there is barely any attention paid to nutrition or the equally thorny question of how to lose weight. Medical training begins in medical school, where standard curricula include a mandated number of hours for nutrition which varies depending upon where you did your training. Generally, during the 4 years of medical school, it is about 10-20 hours. I did my medical training at the University of Toronto and...

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Breathing through the nose may offer unique brain benefits

Folklore, spiritual traditions and even mothers have for ages drawn an implicit connection between respiration and state of mind: Breathe in deeply through your nose, we are told, to clarify thoughts, achieve serenity, defuse tantrums. There isn't a lot of scientific evidence to back up these ideas, but a growing number of experiments have been looking at the influence that breathing has on our cognition. In October, a study in The Journal of Neuroscience considered the relationship between memory and how we breathe. Recognizing odors is a key survival mechanism for most creatures - including humans, of course. This is why neuroscientists believe the links between thinking and breathing were early evolutionary adaptations. Studies have shown that when rodents sniff, the flow of even odorless air initiates brain activity by stimulating neurons in what's called the olfactory bulb, which then...

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