Regular exercise may keep your body 30 years ‘younger’

The muscles of older men and women who have exercised for decades are indistinguishable in many ways from those of healthy 25-year-olds. The muscles of older men and women who have exercised for decades are indistinguishable in many ways from those of healthy 25-year-olds, according to an uplifting new study of a group of active septuagenarians. These men and women also had much higher aerobic capacities than most people their age, the study showed, making them biologically about 30 years younger than their chronological ages, the study's authors concluded. ...

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Happy hormones: Goat yoga – the greatest of all time or a passing fad?

We have had anti-gravity yoga, laughter yoga and doga. Now goats are getting in on the action, too. The main difference between yoga and goat yoga: while you are holding your best downward dog, a goat might stand on your back. It is a growing trend that started in Oregon in the US, and has been embraced by celebrities such as Khloe Kardashian. Donna McCheyne, who has been teaching goat yoga classes on a farm in Devon for the past two years, believes the appeal lies in the calming effects the animals have on participants and the laughter their antics inspire. "We connect with the animals. It helps to release any cortisol that's in the body. It also increases your happy hormones," McCheyne says. Carolyn Cowan, a yoga instructor from London, says: "Having to work harder with a creature moving...

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FLASHBACK: Key to longevity, according to the third oldest Icelander: no health foods, vegetables or fruit

Various different miracle diets have been promoted as the key to a long and healthy life, but none of these hold any appeal to one of Iceland's oldest persons. Guðrún Straumfjörð, who celebrates her 105th birthday today, claims that the key to longevity is to stay clear of all health foods and shun fruits and vegetables. Guðrún is the third oldest Icelander alive. ...

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How dealing with past trauma may be the key to breaking addiction

Opening up to past trauma is difficult, but self-awareness is key to addressing issues that leave us vulnerable What's your poison, people sometimes ask, but Gabor Maté doesn't want to ask what my poison is, he wants to ask how it makes me feel. Whatever it is I'm addicted to, or ever have been addicted to, it's not what it is but what it does - to me, to you, to anyone. He believes that anything we've ever craved helped us escape emotional pain. It gave us peace of mind, a sense of control and a feeling of happiness. And all of that, explains Maté, reveals a great deal about addiction, which he defines as any behaviour that gives a person temporary relief and pleasure, but also has negative consequences, and to which the individual will return time and again....

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SOTT FOCUS: The Truth Perspective: How To Survive A Totalitarian Nightmare: The Psychology Of Tyranny

What is it like to live in a country with a brutal, totalitarian government? According to Dr. Andrew Lobaczewski, the only way to truly know is to actually experience it. Literary accounts and news reports can provide some data, but even that will only be theoretical. Actually experiencing it is something else entirely: a punch in the gut that can cause anxiety, depression, and PTSD. But there's one other way to get an idea: a first-hand experience with malevolence at the hands of someone with a sever personality disorder. Today on the Truth Perspective we discuss chapter 6 of Lobaczewski's book Political Ponerology: "Normal People Under Pathocratic Rule". The reason people who have lived with a pathological individual know what it's like to live under a pathocracy is because the two experiences are analogous: they both involve personality-disordered individuals in...

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