Letter to doctors: It’s time to redefine ‘EMF sensitivity’

Even though I too am hypersensitive to EMF, I am concerned that the terms EMF Sensitivity and Hypersensitivity may be too compartmental, when the ramifications are so profound and universal. By identifying our symptoms as somehow unique to us alone, we are separating ourselves from the rest of humanity. We become "those" people, different from all the rest. However, there are at least two other categories: Those who are experiencing symptoms, but neither they nor their doctors are aware of the issue, and there could be millions of them. Then there those who are aware, but are not experiencing symptoms, so they feel free to ignore the issue, thinking it's just "those" people who have a problem. Unfortunately, EMF Sensitivity is not the same as an allergic reaction. Without intervention, those allergic to peanuts would likely die, while others can...

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Study finds red meat as part of a healthy diet linked to reduced risk of multiple sclerosis

People who consume unprocessed red meat as part of a healthy Mediterranean diet may reduce their risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), new research led by Curtin University and The Australian National University has found. The research, published in The Journal of Nutrition, examined data from 840 Australians who took part in the Ausimmune Study to determine whether there was a link between consuming a Mediterranean diet that includes unprocessed red meat, such as lamb, beef and pork, and a reduced risk of a first episode of CNS demyelination, a common precursor to MS. Lead author Dr. Lucinda Black, from the School of Public Health at Curtin University who completed the research as part of her MSWA Postdoctoral Fellowship, said the number of people being diagnosed with MS was increasing globally, suggesting that environmental factors such as low sun exposure, low...

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The vagus nerve is the key to well-being

Have you ever read something a million times only to one day, for no apparent reason, think "Wait, what is that?" This happened to me the other day for "the vagus nerve." I kept coming across it in relation to deep breathing and mental calmness: "Breathing deeply," Katie Brindle writes in her new book Yang Sheng: The Art of Chinese Self-Healing, "immediately relaxes the body because it stimulates the vagus nerve, which runs from the neck to the abdomen and is in charge of turning off the 'fight or flight' reflex." Also: "Stimulating the vagus nerve," per a recent Harvard Health blog post, "activates your relaxation response, reducing your heart rate and blood pressure." And: Deep breathing "turns on the vagus nerve enough that it acts as a brake on the stress response," as an integrative medicine researcher told the...

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Jordan Peterson: ‘Jesus was the only true Christian – Catholicism is as sane as people can get’

Jordan Peterson, a clinical psychologist and university professor, first came to international prominence after his refusal to use special pronouns for transgender people in his native Canada and went on to become arguably one of the world's most influential public intellectuals. University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson, a public speaker and internet sensation, has praised Catholicism as the "sanest" religious concept out there. "I think that Catholicism - that's as sane as people can get," Peterson told conservative writer Dennis Prager at the PragerU summit in California last week. ...

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Bye-bye superbugs? Scientists discover compound toxic to antibiotic resistant bacteria

Deadly, drug-resistant superbugs that endanger millions every year could soon be knocked out after scientists have discovered a compound that is toxic to the dangerous bacteria but not to humans. Gram negative bacteria is a multi-drug resistant bug that threatens hospitals and nursing homes with deadly illnesses like pneumonia and bloodstream infections. It is an incredibly difficult infection to treat and is top of the World Health Organization's list of priority pathogens that need new medicines. No new treatments have been created in 50 years. However that looks set to change after researchers from Sheffield University tweaked the structures of metal-based compounds found in anticancer drugs. "We ended up with something that was toxic towards bacteria, particularly gram negative bacteria, and not toxic towards humans,"said Jim Thomas, professor of bio-inorganic chemistry at Sheffield University. ...

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