The APA guidelines are wrong. It’s ok to be stoic, competitive, dominant and aggressive – but don’t take it to the extreme

Boys and men shouldn't follow the advice of a recent report by the American Psychological Association called "Guidelines for the Psychological Practice with Men and Boys." These guidelines imply that "traditional masculinity" - such as stoicism, competitiveness, dominance, and aggression - are harmful. These guidelines are wrong. Stoically controlling your emotions is necessary. Competitive spirit drives success. Dominance - and the mental and physical strength required to dominate - is far superior to a lack of strength, which results in being dominated by someone else. And aggression is a means to an end. Without aggressive action, you will likely be on the receiving end, bowing to someone else's aggression. Of course, it would be nice to conjure up a world where those "traditionally masculine" traits are outmoded and unnecessary. Perhaps in that fantasy world everyone could just let their emotions...

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WHO says vaccine hesitancy ranks with Ebola and HIV as global threats

The anti-vaccination trend has landed next to HIV and Ebola as a key global threat, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Experts say "vaccine hesitancy" risks reversing progress in fighting preventable diseases. Although various diseases that can be prevented by vaccines, such as diphtheria and meningitis, were on WHO's health threat lists before, in 2019 the organization included "vaccine hesitancy." Among other top 10 threats are HIV/AIDS, the global influenza pandemic, along with the spread of the deadly Ebola virus and Dengue fever, as well as air pollution, lack of primary care and noncommunicable diseases like diabetes. Vaccination remains one of the most "cost-effective" ways to avoid infection, WHO stated, and refusing it directly threatens to cancel out the progress made in fighting preventable diseases. The WHO listed "complacency" and "lack of confidence" among the key reasons why people...

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FLASHBACK: Carl Sagan said ‘reincarnation deserves serious study’: Years later the results of those studies are in

Carl Sagan, the well-known American astronomer, astrobiologist, cosmologist, astrophysicist, and author passed away in 1996. He was very skeptical of non-mainstream work, and was the same when it came to many topics within the realm of parapsychology. Almost 20 years later, we now have substantial evidence to confirm that various phenomena within the realm of parapsychology are indeed real. Some of these include telepathy, psychokinesis, distant healing, ESP, and many others, including reincarnation. Sagan did not brush off the scientific study of these phenomena, in fact, he felt that some of them deserve "serious study." "There are claims in the parapsychology field which, in my opinion, deserve serious study," with being "that young children sometimes report details of a previous life, which upon checking turn out to be accurate and which they could not have known about in any...

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Vaccine skepticism in Australia now punishable by 10 years in jail

Australian nurses and midwives who dare to speak out against the dangers of vaccinations on social media or in person will be prosecuted, the Australian government has warned, urging members of the public to report vaccine skeptics to the authorities. Medical professionals face a jail sentence of 10 years for expressing doubt about the effectiveness of vaccinations or urging further studies into vaccine safety. Opponents of the new law claim free speech and scientific integrity is under attack in Australia by a government that has been bought and paid for by Big Pharma. "With no exceptions we expect all registered nurses, enrolled nurses and midwives to use the best available evidence in making practice decisions. This includes providing information to the public about public health issues," Chair of the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA) Dr. Lynette Cusack said...

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Melbourne hospital to conduct magic mushroom trial for end-of-life patients

Palliative care patients will be treated with the psychoactive ingredient in magic mushrooms in a bid to reduce their anxiety during end of life care. The first of 30 patients in Melbourne's St Vincent's Hospital trial will be treated with psilocybin in April after a year-long battle to have the study approved by the ethics committee, as well as state and federal authorities. Patients will be given a single dose of the psychedelic drug, which stimulates feelings of euphoria and is believed to be able to ease anxiety, fear and depression for up to six months. Applicants will be screened, requiring a state government permit to take the medication, and will be closely monitored by two clinicians on the 'dose day' while the initial high wears-off. ...

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