Employees are most productive when bosses are kind and compassionate

Feel like your employees aren't giving it their all in the office? A daily dose of genuine kindness and compassion may do the trick. A recent study by researchers at Binghamton University finds that simply being nice to employees and taking interest in them personally and professionally almost always leads to better productivity and improved job performance overall. "Being benevolent is important because it can change the perception your followers have of you," explains researcher Chou-Yu Tsai, assistant professor at Binghamton University's School of Management, in a university release. "If you feel that your leader or boss actually cares about you, you may feel more serious about the work you do for them." Tsai and his team of international researchers tried to determine how the presence and lack of generally benevolent attitudes and behaviors by superiors affect the performance and...

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7 Ways to prevent or even reverse heart disease with nutrition

Considering that heart disease is the #1 cause of death in the developed world, anything that can prevent or reduce cardiac mortality, or slow or even reverse the cardiovascular disease process, should be of great interest to health professionals and the general public alike. Sadly, millions are still unaware of the extensive body of biomedical literature that exists supporting the use of natural compounds for preventing and even reversing heart disease, which we have indexed on GreenMedInfo.com. Instead, they spend billions of healthcare dollars annually on highly toxic cholesterol-lowering pharmaceuticals such as statin drugs which have known cardiotoxicity, among 300 other proven side effects, simply because their doctors told them to do so. Bad advice is the rule and not the exception here. For instance, after decades of recommending a so-called 'low dose' aspirin to prevent heart disease and stroke,...

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Our skin keeps time independent of the brain

Squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, amphibians, and chameleon lizards are among the animals that can change the color of their skin in a blink of an eye. They have photoreceptors in their skin that operate independently of their brains. The photoreceptors are part of a family of proteins known as opsins. Mammals have opsins, too. They are the most abundant proteins in the retina. These light-sensing photopigments are responsible for color vision (cone opsins) and vision in dim light (rhodopsin). While previous studies have suggested that mammals might express opsin proteins outside the eye, there was little information on what functions they might influence. A study published Oct. 10 in Current Biology has now found that a type of opsin known as neuropsin is expressed in the hair follicles of mice and synchronize the skin's circadian clock to the light-dark cycle, independent...

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5 Rules of Recovery for Addictions of Any Kind

Not all rules work for all people, nor do they necessarily work in the way you want them to work. But when it comes to Recovery, these 5 Rules are rock-solid. 1. Change Your Life Changes may not be easy as ABC or 1-2-3, but here's a way to remember the key: - Adjust attitude: work beyond negative thoughts - Beware people, places, and things associated with using - Complete Honesty ...

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Leading neurocriminologist Adrian Raine considers Joker “a great educational tool”

Adrian Raine did not go into his screening of Joker last Friday with lofty expectations. The neurocriminologist is a pioneer in researching the minds of violent criminals, having been the first person to use brain imaging to study murderers. Truthfully, the revered British researcher — who devoted decades of his life to understanding what makes criminals tick — just wasn't that much of a Batman fan. So when he stepped into a Darlington, England, screening of the controversial Todd Phillips film, it was mostly to spend quality time with his nephews while on break from his professorial duties at the University of Pennsylvania. But what Raine saw onscreen stunned him. According to the neurocriminologist, the script — from Phillips and Scott Silver — authentically traces the way a man could be driven to deeply troubling acts of violence by a...

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