Women exposed to light during sleep at higher risk for weight gain

Sleeping with a cellphone, bright alarm clock on or a television next to your bed puts women at risk for weight gain, a new study found. Women who slept with a light or even the TV on were 17% more likely to have gained 11 pounds over the course of five years, according to the study, the results of which were published Monday in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Light coming in from outside the room was associated with more modest weight gain, researchers found. The study is the first to find an association between exposure to artificial light at night while sleeping and weight gain in women, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which funded the study. ...

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Super-soldier diet? Pentagon eyes controversial keto diet in bid to build more lethal warriors

Ditching carbs may be the key to military success in America's future wars. Top Pentagon officials say research has shown that human bodies in ketosis - the goal of the popular and controversial ketogenic diet - can stay underwater for longer periods, making the fat- and protein-heavy eating plan a potential benefit to military divers. It is one example of a rapidly growing trend as military researchers zero in on how nutrition and certain drugs can enhance how fighting men and women perform in battle. But U.S. defense officials say they lack the legal authorities to dictate to soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines what they can and cannot eat. Critics of the entire concept warn that the military is entering a danger-filled world if it begins ordering diets and drug protocols solely to build more lethal warriors. ...

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Can you do 40 pushups? Harvard scientists say your risk of heart attack is over 30 times less

And even if you can't, every pushup you can do over a certain number can reduce your risk. We all want to live long lives. We all want to live healthy lives. Health and fitness aren't just an outside interest; health and fitness can play a major role in your success. While the physical benefits clearly matter, the mental benefits of improved health and fitness on your professional and personal life -- perseverance, resilience, determination, and mental toughness -- are just as important. But being healthy and fit is tough when the nature of most work involves sitting at a desk all day -- and, if you're an entrepreneur knee-deep in launching your startup, all evening, too. But how can you determine the impact of a relatively sedentary professional lifestyle? Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading causes of premature...

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Twenty-four cases of the mumps confirmed at the University of Florida

It all started when Caillin Heron's jaw started to hurt and she found it hard to chew. That lead to a high fever, aches, pains and a severely swollen face. A few days later, the second army lieutenant and recent UF criminology graduate was diagnosed with the mumps. As of Tuesday afternoon, University of Florida spokesperson Steve Orlando confirmed there are 24 cases of the mumps on campus. All 24 students were vaccinated. Herron said it felt like a really bad flu and the worst face pain she'd ever experienced. "At one point I was sleeping sitting up," said Herron. ...

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Harvard researchers say certain ADHD medications may increase risk of psychosis

Certain medications commonly used to treat ADHD in teens and young adults may increase their risk of psychosis, according to new research from Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital. The potential of developing psychosis was greater in younger patients who take amphetamines, such as Adderall or Vyvanse, than those taking methylphenidates, such as Ritalin or Concerta, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday. The researchers studied 13- to 25-year-olds. They defined psychosis as hallucinations, delusional disorder, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder with psychotic features or unspecified psychosis. ...

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Low carb and mental health: The food-mood connection

Eating a low-carbohydrate whole-foods diet appears to be a powerful strategy for protecting and improving the health of the body. Could this same nutritional strategy benefit the brain as well? Emerging science and clinical experience suggest that the answer is a resounding yes.1 Many people think of mental health problems like depression, anxiety, and ADHD as chemical imbalances that require medication, but how often do we stop to wonder what causes these chemical imbalances? While medications are clearly helpful and important for some individuals, one could argue that the most powerful way to change brain chemistry is through food - because that's where brain chemicals come from in the first place. This logical idea has given birth to the new and exciting field of nutritional psychiatry, dedicated to understanding how dietary choices affect our mood, thinking, and behavior. Emerging science...

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Anxiety may be alleviated by regulating gut bacteria

People who experience anxiety symptoms might be helped by taking steps to regulate the microorganisms in their gut using probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements, suggests a review of studies published today in the journal General Psychiatry. Anxiety symptoms are common in people with mental diseases and a variety of physical disorders, especially in disorders that are related to stress. Previous studies have shown that as many as a third of people will be affected by anxiety symptoms during their lifetime. Increasingly, research has indicated that gut microbiota -- the trillions of microorganisms in the gut which perform important functions in the immune system and metabolism by providing essential inflammatory mediators, nutrients and vitamins -- can help regulate brain function through something called the "gut-brain axis." Recent research also suggests that mental disorders could be treated by regulating the intestinal...

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Mum dies after shunning NHS treatment for curable cancer and going vegan instead

A mum who was diagnosed with treatable breast cancer has died after shunning medicine in favour of living a vegan and holistic lifestyle. Katie Britton-Jordan, from Dalbury Lees, Derbyshire, was told she had triple negative breast cancer in July 2016 after finding a lump in her breast while feeding daughter Delilah when she was three. She was offered a mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy that would save her life but instead chose alternative methods including taking up a vegan diet. Her husband Neil announced Katie's death on Facebook yesterday. ...

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Can science tell us how much alcohol you can drink safely?

Humans have been drinking fermented concoctions since the beginning of recorded time. But despite that long relationship with alcohol, we still don't know what exactly the molecule does to our brains to create a feeling of intoxication. Likewise, though the health harms of heavy drinking are fairly obvious, scientists have struggled to identify what negative impacts lesser volumes may lead to. Last September, the prestigious peer-reviewed British medical journal The Lancet published a study that is thought to be the most comprehensive global analysis of the risks of alcohol consumption. Its conclusion, which the media widely reported, sounded unequivocal: "The safest level of drinking is none." Sorting through the latest research on how to optimize your well-being is a constant and confounding feature of modern life. A scientific study becomes a press release becomes a news alert, shedding context at...

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Is there a proper way to shower?

Taking a daily shower is a fairly recent development for Americans. Just 100 years ago, many thought getting their whole body wet at once (instead of taking the sponge baths that were common then) would invite diseases like pneumonia and someone would "catch their death." Nowadays, a long, hot shower is a daily ritual for Many Americans. Most soaps and personal care products have surfactants that, when combined with water, bind to oil and remove the beneficial fats called sebum that naturally protect your skin.1 Generally speaking, the more a product bubbles or lathers, the more surfactants it contains. Many people spend money to buy expensive lotions to restore or replenish the natural skin oils they remove when they shower. The irony is that most of the skin lotions people buy to use after they shower are far inferior to...

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