Bayer Monsanto faces a second trial over Roundup causing cancer

Bayer AG on Monday faced a second U.S. jury over allegations that its popular glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup causes cancer, six months after the company's share price was rocked by a $289 million verdict in California state court. The lawsuit by California resident Edwin Hardeman against the company began on Monday morning in federal rather than state court. The trial is also a test case for a larger litigation. More than 760 of the 9,300 Roundup cases nationwide are consolidated in the federal court in San Francisco that is hearing Hardeman's case. Bayer denies all allegations that Roundup or glyphosate cause cancer, specifically non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, saying decades of independent studies have shown the world's most widely used weed killer to be safe for human use and noting that regulators around the world have approved the product. During the first phase...

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Autism diagnoses in Northern Ireland children up by more than 100% in 5 years

The number of children being diagnosed with autism in Northern Ireland has more than doubled in five years. Some health trusts have seen a three-fold increase and there are also 2,500 under-18s still waiting to be assessed. Healthcare professionals and autism charities have pointed to increased awareness as a reason for the jump. Kerry Boyd, the head of Autism NI, said her organisation is "inundated" with requests for support. ...

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Food as medicine: Mushrooms for longevity

The idea of "food as medicine" may be a bit hard to swallow, especially if you have a gourmand's palate. What if you could fight a host of diseases and even increase your longevity, just by adding a few delicious servings of fungus to your diet every day? Paul Stamets, renowned mycologist (that's a mushroom expert) and TedTalk favorite, fervently believes that mushrooms can save the world. He describes fungi as "the grand molecular disassemblers of nature" due to their transformative ability to generate humus soils from decomposing organic materials. Fungi turn the decay of nature into nutrients for plants, trees, animals, and humans alike. As part of this amazing dance of biosynthesis, mushrooms alchemize Earth's most powerful elements for the benefit of mankind. Fungi produce our best antibiotics, and have medicinal potential for a host of diseases. Certain varieties...

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We have weaker bones than our hunter-gatherer ancestors – this is what you can do about it

Technology is continuously advancing to make our lives "easier", more efficient and often more sedentary. All of this has an impact on our body and, specifically, our bones. Loss of bone strength is one of the least talked about risks of sedentary lifestyles, but is arguably one of the most important, with osteoporosis related fractures occurring in one in three women and one in five men. There is a direct relationship between the lack of oestrogen after menopause and the development of osteoporosis. As a society, we are more sedentary than ever before. The use of transport, electric rather than manual bikes, and having our weekly grocery shopping ordered online and delivered to the comfort of our homes are all at odds with keeping active. Children in particular are less active - with computer games replacing "playing out" during a...

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The Crisis of Science

In recent years, the public has gradually discovered that there is a crisis in science. But what is the problem? And how bad is it, really? Today on The Corbett Report we shine a spotlight on the series of interrelated crises that are exposing the way institutional science is practiced today, and what it means for an increasingly science-dependent society. For those with limited bandwidth, CLICK HERE to download a smaller, lower file size version of this episode. For those interested in audio quality, CLICK HERE for the highest-quality version of this episode (WARNING: very large download). ...

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Study shows parents who cuddle, touch their babies may change their DNA

Even though there has always been a long-standing myth that you shouldn't cuddle or hold your baby for too long because you might "spoil" the child, so to speak, there's a new study that suggests that isn't necessarily true. Research claims that parents who cuddle and have as much skin-to-skin contact as possible during the first few months of a child's life might end up changing their DNA. According to a study conducted by a team of researchers at the University of British Columbia parents should get in as many cuddles as possible during the early years of a child's life, as there's a strong possibility that all of this lovable contact will influence a child later on in life, too. The study, published in the Journal of Development and Psychopathy, claims that cuddles impact a person's molecular levels and...

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Dr. Brian Hooker’s bombshell testimony before Congress reveals how MMR vaccines INCREASE deaths from measles

Via Children's Health Defense , headed by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., who is perhaps the only prominent Democrat in America that's actually fighting to protect children from toxic vaccines, 5G electromagnetic radiation and dangerous fluoride chemicals in the water supply: (Testimony from Dr. Brian S. Hooker) There is a problem with measles in Washington State, but it's not low vaccination rates, it's actually high vaccination rates with a vaccine product unable to provide lifetime immunity or vigorous passive maternal protection to infants during the first year of life. When the measles vaccine was first introduced, most people over the age of 15 who had wild measles had lifetime immunity. In developed nations, like other communicable infections, measles was no longer dangerous except in rare circumstances because of inadequate nutrition, poor sanitation, and / or lack of healthcare. Because having the...

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If only 1% of all vaccine injuries are reported, the $4 billion paid out is just the tip of the iceberg

In most public health communications about vaccination, officials gloss over vaccine risks, dismissing any possible "side effects" as mild. However, vaccination programs have always resulted in more serious vaccine injuries for some. In the 1970s and early 1980s, for example, the diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) vaccine and its whole-cell pertussis component had chalked up so much vaccine damage that a television documentary likened receiving a DPT shot to playing "vaccine roulette." After the DPT debacle began attracting widespread attention, vaccine manufacturers started pressuring Congress for protection from vaccine injury lawsuits. Congress obliged. In 1986, President Reagan signed into existence a radical piece of legislation - the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA) - which launched what the Act described as an "alternative remedy to judicial action for specified vaccine-related injuries." A key component of the legislation involved creating the National Vaccine... ...

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Corn derivatives lurk in many surprising places

When Christine Robinson was first diagnosed with a corn allergy 17 years ago, she remembers thinking, "No more popcorn, no more tacos. I can do this." Then she tried to put salt on her tomatoes. (Table salt has dextrose, a sugar derived from corn.) She tried drinking bottled iced tea. (It contains citric acid, which often comes from mold grown in corn-derived sugar.) She tried bottled water. (Added minerals in some brands can be processed with a corn derivative.) She ultimately gave up on supermarket meat (sprayed with lactic acid from fermented corn sugars), bagged salads (citric acid, again), fish (dipped in cornstarch or syrup before freezing), grains (cross-contaminated in processing facilities), fruits like apples and citrus (waxed with corn-derived chemicals), tomatoes (ripened with ethylene gas from corn), milk (added vitamins processed with corn derivatives). And that's not even getting...

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New study on Cannabis and Autism supports parents’ longtime claims

Parents of some autistic children have long reported that their kids calm down with cannabinoids, are better able to communicate, and can do more tasks by themselves. But because of the restrictions on cannabis research in the United States, there have been precious few real-world studies to confirm those anecdotal reports. A recent study out of Israel, which approved cannabis research in 2007, gives parents new evidence to back up those claims. Published Jan 17. in the journal Nature, the study found that yes, cannabis can relieve some of the symptoms suffered by many autistic people, including seizures, restlessness, and rage attacks. ...

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