Cadets create indoor ‘organic farm’ inside shipping containers

Inside three shipping containers on the campus of The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, cadets are learning how to grow lettuce crops in a controlled indoor "farm" setting, producing organic produce in an environment that can withstand unpredictable weather conditions and disease. The cadets' hands-on education comes from The Citadel Sustainability Project, in which the first shipping container functions as a hydroponic cultivation system for lettuce crops, the second container is a testing ground for various growing systems, and the third container will be outfitted by cadets who design and build the growing equipment as part of a corresponding independent study. The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence initiated the project in 2016 as an interdisciplinary collaboration. Of the 20 or so students who are members of the Sustainability Club, several are STEM Scholars. We also have electrical engineers...

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Glyphosate found to raise the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by 41%

A broad new scientific analysis of the cancer-causing potential of glyphosate herbicides, the most widely used weedkilling products in the world, has found that people with high exposures to the popular pesticides have a 41% increased risk of developing a type of cancer called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The evidence "supports a compelling link" between exposures to glyphosate-based herbicides and increased risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the authors concluded, though they said the specific numerical risk estimates should be interpreted with caution. The findings by five US scientists contradict the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) assurances of safety over the weed killer and come as regulators in several countries consider limiting the use of glyphosate-based products in farming. Monsanto and its German owner Bayer AG face more than 9,000 lawsuits in the US brought by people suffering from NHL who blame Monsanto's...

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Protect Fido! Studies link canine cancers to lawn chemicals

"Lawn chemicals, particularly, ones containing 2,4-D, have been linked to at least two types of canine cancers. Studies found that lawn chemicals travel to neighboring yards and inside homes, and chemicals have been found in the urine of dogs whose owners did not spray their lawns." Sadly, the evidence that lawn chemicals are linked to cancers in dogs has been accumulating steadily over the past 20 years. Even if you don't own a pet this should raise alarms for anyone who cares about children or just your own health. As Prof. John Reiff of Colorado State University reminds us, "Animals may be sensitive indicators of environmental hazards and provide an early warning system for public health intervention, as exemplified by the iconic canary in the coal mine." He shared the results of work at Purdue University's School of Veterinary Medicine...

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Los Angeles firefighters report neurological damage after cell tower installation near their station

The conversation about 5G within the mainstream is becoming quite concerning for onlookers, as there's been an increase in awareness about the health concerns of wireless radiation. Sure, there are natural sources of electromagnetic radiation on both ends of the spectrum in our environment, but never before has humanity experienced this much. The main reason why this is so concerning is because: "Wireless radiation has biological effects. Period. This is no longer a subject for debate when you look at PubMed and the peer-review literature. These effects are seen in all life forms; plants, animals, insects, microbes. In humans, we have clear evidence of cancer now: there is no question We have evidence of DNA damage, cardiomyopathy, which is the precursor of congestive heart failure, neuropsychiatric effects." (Dr. Sharon Goldberg, 5G Small Cell Tower Hearing In Michigan) You don't have...

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Israeli start-up company using canines to detect cancer

A Negev start-up company is using canines to determine if an individual has cancer. Prognose 220 Mil is inviting the public to send a saliva sample to their laboratory, via messenger, where specially trained dogs use their strong sense of smell to sniff for cancer. "The main significance of the test is life saving early detection (of cancer). Since dogs are able to identify the characteristic scent of the disease," says lab manager and dog trainer Uri Bekman. If the dog sits still after sniffing the sample, that is an indication of the disease being present. The test costs NIS 400. Yael Dror Alon, a businesswoman from Caesarea, took the test and tested positive, despite doctors giving her a clean bill of health. She is now undergoing treatment at Tel Hashomer Medical Center and has decided to embark on a...

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World Health Organization declares: Anti-vaxxers are among the top ‘threats to global health’ in 2019

Anti-vaxxers have been named one of the top threats to global health in 2019 by the World Health Organization (WHO). The anti-vaccine movement joined air pollution and climate change, HIV, and a worldwide influenza pandemic on the list released on Monday. 'Vaccine hesitancy', as the WHO calls it, 'threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-preventable diseases.' The organization added in its statement: 'Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways of avoiding disease - it currently prevents million deaths a year, and a further 1.5 million could be avoided if global coverage of vaccinations improved.' ...

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Measles outbreak rocks Madagascar

While the US faces measles outbreaks from New York to Washington state, reigniting discussions about the risk of parents who refuse to vaccinate their children, Madagascar has been fighting the worst eruption of the disease in decades. Since October, the African island nation has seen more than 50,000 cases of the highly contagious viral infection, which has so far taken the lives of more than 300 people, mostly kids, the country's secretary general of the ministry of health tells CNN. That's more than double the numbers reported by the World Health Organization (WHO) in mid-January. "We heard rumblings of a measles outbreak in the capital between December and January and I just knew we were going to get hit," Lon Kightlinger, a former South Dakota state epidemiologist and regular Peace Corp volunteer in Madagascar, tells CNN. "Our one doctor here,...

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PFAS blamed for animal deformities and losses to farmers in New South Wales

The heartbreak of watching thousands of fish grow with twisted spines and deformed skulls has taken Greg Semple to a "pretty dark place, mentally". The owner of Murray Cod Hatcheries in the south-western New South Wales town of Wagga Wagga took over the business in 1996. "It's all been downhill since then," Mr Semple said. "In the spring-summer breeding season in 1996, we produced 1.2 million healthy native fingerlings in just one hectare of ponds. "Other ponds were being used to grow tons of food-sized fish. ...

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Vaccines distributed in Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana causing infections

The vaccine you received for the flu, whooping cough or hepatitis A might not work. And on top of that, it might have actually infected you. Kentucky's health department is sounding the alarm Friday night about a vaccine made in Mount Sterling. Location Vaccination started providing vaccines for businesses in Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana in September. Shortly after, some people started noticing swelling and lumps at the injection site. The health department says the vaccine was contaminated because it wasn't stored properly. The company is stopping its distribution. ...

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The benefits of fasting: More than just a fad

You may have heard about it. You may have even tried fasting. You might even be the one who's tried fasting and who's been so successful at it and you are now a huge proponent of it. But did you know that researchers are busy studying whether is a good thing or just a fad, and are fast concluding that fasting benefits you in more ways than one? For example, one small study shows that the oxidative stress of fasting may have a positive effect on your body, from producing antioxidant compounds in response to the stress, to protecting your body from aging and enhancing mitochondrial activity. According to Inverse, identifying all the benefits of fasting is still in its infancy, but one thing researchers are sure of so far is that "fasting really changes the body" and that science...

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