Controversial treatment gives transfusions of ‘young blood’ from teenagers to reverse process of aging

Could the secret to eternal youth be found in blood transfusions from young people? Some claim that transfusions with "young blood" from teenagers can reverse the aging process. It's being tested in patients over the age of 35 as part of a clinical trial called ambrosia, where people paid $8,000 to get the rich growth factors found in bloods plasma platelets. "There are pretty much people from most states, people from overseas, people from Europe and Australia," Dr. Jesse Karmazin said. Results of the trial have not been published. Dr. Karmazin, who plans to open a business selling young blood, says patients who've had it say they feel amazing, and he says he's seen evidence of reversing the aging process in rats. ...

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Let there be light! Scientists find brain circuit that could explain seasonal depression

Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source Just in time for the winter solstice, scientists may have figured out how short days can lead to dark moods. Two recent studies suggest the culprit is a brain circuit that connects special light-sensing cells in the retina with brain areas that affect whether you are happy or sad. When these cells detect shorter days, they appear to use this pathway to send signals to the brain that can make a person feel glum or even depressed. "It's very likely that things like seasonal affective disorder involve this pathway," says Jerome Sanes, a professor of neuroscience at Brown University. Sanes was part of a team that...

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Body maps show schizophrenia may effect how one experiences emotion

Colorful figures of the human body are helping Vanderbilt University researchers understand how people experience emotion through their bodies and how this process is radically altered in people with schizophrenia. Sohee Park, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Psychology, and Ph.D. student Lénie J. Torregrossa compared individuals with schizophrenia with matched control participants, asking each to fill in a "body map" in a way that correlates to the way they physically experience emotion. They used a computerized coloring task to locate where participants feel sensations when they experience, for example, anger or depression. The outcomes differed radically between groups, with the control group showing distinct maps of sensations for 13 different emotions, indicating specific patterns of increased arousal and decreased energy across the body for each emotion. However, in individuals with schizophrenia, there was an overall reduction of bodily sensation across...

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Scientists succeed in destroying HIV infected cells, suggest it will lead to a ‘cure’ for AIDS

Teams at the Institut Pasteur in Paris announced on Thursday they had succeeded in their work to destroy cells infected with HIV. Their work, published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism, offers hope of a cure for AIDS patients. Up to now, there has been no cure for AIDS, but instead, the disease has been treated by antiretrovirals. These drugs block the infection and have saved many lives since they were discovered in the 90s, but they do not eliminate HIV cells from the body. Comment: Far from saving lives, antiretrovirals are not only ineffective but have actually shortened lives. In the period 1988 through 1996, there were 235,000 recorded AIDS deaths. AZT caused more than 96 percent of these deaths. See: Questioning the HIV-AIDS hypothesis Patients are forced to take antiretrovirals for life because the drugs do not destroy...

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Just 6 months of walking may reverse cognitive decline, study says

Worried about your aging brain? Getting your heart pumping with something as simple as walking or cycling just three times a week seems to improve thinking skills, new research says. Add a heart-healthy diet, and you maximize the benefits, possibly shaving years off your brain's functional age, according to the study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology. "Our operating model was that by improving cardiovascular risk, you're also improving neurocognitive functioning," said lead study author James Blumenthal, a clinical psychologist at Duke University. "You're improving brain health at the same time as improving heart health." ...

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Junk food cravings linked to lack of sleep, study suggests

Having even one night without sleep leads people to view junk food more favourably, research suggests. Scientists attribute the effect to the way food rewards are processed by the brain. Previous studies have found that a lack of shuteye is linked to expanding waistlines, with some suggesting disrupted sleep might affect hormone levels, resulting in changes in how hungry or full people feel. But the latest study suggests that with hormones may have little to do with the phenomenon, and that the cause could be changes in the activity within and between regions of the brain involved in reward and regulation. ...

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Doctoring Data – Science has turned to darkness

As readers of this blog know I was obliterated from Wikipedia recently. Many have expressed support and told me not to get down about it. To be perfectly frank, the only time I knew I was on Wikipedia was when someone told me I was going to be removed. So it hasn't caused great psychological trauma. In fact my feelings about this are probably best expressed on a Roman tombstone. It has been translated in different ways, but my favourite version is the following: I was not I was I am not I care not However, whilst my removal from Wiki is, in one way, completely irrelevant in the greater scheme of things. In another way it is hugely important. As Saladin said of Jerusalem, whilst he was battling with the Christians during the crusades. 'Jerusalem is nothing; Jerusalem is...

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Dr. Mark Sircus: The cannabis cure for cancer

This quick overview of the science backs up the assertion that every cancer patient and every oncologist should put medical marijuana on their treatment maps. There should be no more confusion about whether or not marijuana is effective for cancer patients. Medical marijuana is chemotherapy, natural style, for cancer patients. The two forms of hemp oil, one with THC and CBD and the other CBD alone (which is pretty much legal everywhere) provide the body with chemo-therapeutics without the danger and staggering side effects. There are many chapters in my book about cancer patients using marijuana, but in this one we present a quick overview of the science that backs up the assertion that every cancer patient and every oncologist should put medical marijuana on their treatment maps. What you will see in this article is reference to many scientific...

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Heart-breaking season: Christmas Eve the peak time for heart attacks, says study

For some, Christmas can be a time of stress instead of peace and goodwill - and a new Swedish study shows that 10 pm on Christmas Eve is the annual peak time for heart attack risk, particularly for the elderly and those with existing conditions. Researchers analysed data from 283,014 heart attacks reported to Swedish hospitals between 1998 and 2013, and compared with weeks outside of holiday periods as a control measure. In Sweden, Christmas Eve is actually the bigger event than Christmas Day, and researchers noted a 37 percent increased risk on this day, peaking at 10 pm. More generally there was a 15 percent increased risk over the Christmas period. The risk was greatest in the over 75s and those with existing diabetes or heart disease. The study also noted more cases of heart attacks reported on Midsummer...

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