The ‘CICOpaths’ – Who’s to blame for fat-shaming?

The main reason why obesity is such an emotionally charged issue is simply that it has become entangled with all kinds of aspersions on a person's willpower and character. It is completely different from almost every other disease because there is always the unspoken accusation that you did it to yourself. There is always the feeling that you could have done something about it if you weren't such a weak willed glutton. Many physicians unconsciously engage in 'fat shaming' because they believe that this gives patients extra 'motivation' to lose weight. As if the whole world was not reminding them every single day. So, who deserves the blame? The 'Calories In Calories Out' (CICO) crowd - those physicians and researchers who have strenuously and constantly cried that 'A calorie is a calorie' or 'It's all about calories' or 'Eat Less,...

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‘Young miracle’: Baby recovers from second-deadliest Ebola outbreak in Congo

They call her the "young miracle." A baby who was admitted to an Ebola treatment center just six days after birth has now recovered from the virus. Congo's health ministry calls the baby the youngest survivor in what is now the world's second-deadliest Ebola outbreak. The ministry late Thursday tweeted a photo of the infant, swaddled and with tiny mouth open in yawn or squall, surrounded by caregivers who watched over her 24 hours a day for weeks. The baby's mother, who had Ebola, died in childbirth, the ministry said. The infant was discharged from the treatment center in Beni on Wednesday. "She went home in the arms of her father and her aunt," the ministry said. ...

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The enormous threat to America’s last grasslands

Over the past few years, Neil Shook has watched his world burn acre by acre. "I could tell something was happening," Shook recalled, when he first noticed the plumes of smoke in 2011. By 2013, fires were raging every day, sending smoke billowing into the air - imagery that reminded Shook of Kuwait's burning oil wells during the Persian Gulf War. Hundreds of acres of rolling green grasslands in North Dakota were being intentionally burned, plowed and planted in a matter of days. Shook, who manages the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge and surrounding conservation area, watched as landowners backed out of federally funded conservation programs, opting instead to cash in on the state's economic boom. "This was all grass," Shook shouted as he wildly gestured toward a vast expanse of plowed, brown farmland near...

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Former ‘Vaccine bully’ pediatrician now claims unvaccinated children are healthiest

Dr. Bob Zajac is a board-certified pediatrician with additional expertise in asthma/allergy care, developmental/behavioral pediatric care, and natural/holistic care. He received his degree in Child Development, and pursued an additional four years of training in a PhD program (Early Childhood Special Education), followed by his medical degree (MD - University of Minnesota - 2000) and residency training (pediatrics - 2000-2003). Prior to starting New Kingdom Pediatrics, Dr. Bob completed his masters of business degree (MBA, Crown College, 2011-2013). Dr. Zajac and his wife Julie have been married for over 25 years and have 8 children. In terms of education and experience, no one can criticize Dr. Zajac as being "uniformed" when it comes to children's health. Dr. Zajac starts out in this interview by explaining medical doctors do NOT receive a lot of training in vaccines, so he had to...

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High levels of glyphosate discovered in K-12 school breakfast foods across America

A new report by the Center for Environmental Health (CEH) found high levels of the toxic weed killer glyphosate in over 70 percent of the oat-based breakfast foods commonly served in K-12 schools across the U.S.. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide, is applied on farms that grow corn, soybeans, oats, and hundreds of other crops. From there, it can make its way into our food, especially popular breakfast cereals and nutrition bars. CEH tested 13 popular breakfast foods served to school children. The report prioritized school districts with high rates of participation in the National School Breakfast Program since low-income children are already disproportionately exposed to toxic chemicals. Items containing the highest levels of glyphosate include Quaker Maple, Brown Sugar Instant Oatmeal, and Quaker Old-Fashioned Oats. CEH did not find glyphosate residues...

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Erin Brockovich: The weedkiller in our food is killing us

Growing research show that glyphosate, one of the most widely used herbicides in the US, causes cancer On a recent Saturday afternoon, in an estuary near Tampa Bay, Florida, I watched airboats move up and down the river banks, spraying massive plumes of weedkiller on to the vegetation. The state of Florida was trying to control and kill off scores of plant species. Nearby, children were lying out in the sun, though they knew better than to swim in the water, which has recently been blooming with toxic algae. Mists of weedkiller drifted downwind toward them. The main active ingredient in that mist, and in the weedkiller being sprayed throughout Tampa Bay, is glyphosate, one of the most widely used herbicides in the US. First registered for use here in 1974, it is now an ingredient in more than 750...

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Your doctor doesn’t know much about nutrition

There are certain things that doctors are great at. How to prescribe medications? Yes. How to do surgery? Yes. Nutrition and weight loss? No, definitely not. You might be a little stunned to hear that admission, coming from a highly trained medical specialist like myself. But, it all comes down to a physician's training and what they see as their circle of competence. Medical training extends over more than a decade, and there is barely any attention paid to nutrition or the equally thorny question of how to lose weight. Medical training begins in medical school, where standard curricula include a mandated number of hours for nutrition which varies depending upon where you did your training. Generally, during the 4 years of medical school, it is about 10-20 hours. I did my medical training at the University of Toronto and...

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Neti pot misuse: Rare brain-eating amoeba strikes Seattle woman

When a 69-year-old Seattle woman underwent brain surgery earlier this year at Swedish Medical Center, her doctors were stumped. Last January, the woman was admitted to the hospital's emergency department after suffering a seizure. Doctors took a CT scan of her brain to determine the cause, finding what they initially thought was a tumor. But an examination of tissue taken from her brain during surgery a day later showed she was up against a much deadlier attack, one that had been underway for about a year and was literally eating her alive. "When I operated on this lady, a section of her brain about the size of a golf ball was bloody mush," Dr. Charles Cobbs, neurosurgeon at Swedish, said in a phone interview. "There were these amoeba all over the place just eating brain cells. We didn't have any...

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Insomniac? Fall asleep naturally with these tips

An estimated 70 million American adults have a sleep disorder, the most common of which is insomnia1 - the inability to fall asleep, or waking up one or more times during the night. If you're in this category, despair not, because the list of strategies to improve your sleep is long. While most sleep problems are tied to lifestyle choices such as spending too much time indoors during daylight hours, and/or excessive use of technology and chronic exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs), which will require you to make (perhaps significant) changes to your lifestyle, a number of tips and tricks can be useful in the short term. A method developed by the U.S. military, revealed in the 1981 book, "Relax and Win: Championship Performance," claims to have a 96 percent success rate after six weeks of consistent implementation. Military Method...

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Daily Mail runs hysterical hit piece on Mikhaila Peterson: “How fake food news is putting us all at risk”

Pedlars of fake food news: Are Gwyneth Paltrow and a Canadian mother of one who claims to cure arthritis by an all-beef diet 'putting us all at risk'? Carrot juice that cures cancer, deadly sweeteners in a can of Coke, and a girl who claims the key to beating arthritis is a steak-only diet. Fake news, all of it. Yet in the largely unregulated world of social media, such extraordinary claims about diet are rife, and are regularly shared - and believed - by millions of internet-users. Last week, in the first of our two-part exposé on health news fakery, we revealed how lives are being put at risk by fake news about vaccines, cholesterol-lowering statins and the risks of mobile phones and plastic bottles. ...

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