Harvard researchers say certain ADHD medications may increase risk of psychosis

Certain medications commonly used to treat ADHD in teens and young adults may increase their risk of psychosis, according to new research from Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital. The potential of developing psychosis was greater in younger patients who take amphetamines, such as Adderall or Vyvanse, than those taking methylphenidates, such as Ritalin or Concerta, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday. The researchers studied 13- to 25-year-olds. They defined psychosis as hallucinations, delusional disorder, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder with psychotic features or unspecified psychosis. ...

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Low carb and mental health: The food-mood connection

Eating a low-carbohydrate whole-foods diet appears to be a powerful strategy for protecting and improving the health of the body. Could this same nutritional strategy benefit the brain as well? Emerging science and clinical experience suggest that the answer is a resounding yes.1 Many people think of mental health problems like depression, anxiety, and ADHD as chemical imbalances that require medication, but how often do we stop to wonder what causes these chemical imbalances? While medications are clearly helpful and important for some individuals, one could argue that the most powerful way to change brain chemistry is through food - because that's where brain chemicals come from in the first place. This logical idea has given birth to the new and exciting field of nutritional psychiatry, dedicated to understanding how dietary choices affect our mood, thinking, and behavior. Emerging science...

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Anxiety may be alleviated by regulating gut bacteria

People who experience anxiety symptoms might be helped by taking steps to regulate the microorganisms in their gut using probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements, suggests a review of studies published today in the journal General Psychiatry. Anxiety symptoms are common in people with mental diseases and a variety of physical disorders, especially in disorders that are related to stress. Previous studies have shown that as many as a third of people will be affected by anxiety symptoms during their lifetime. Increasingly, research has indicated that gut microbiota -- the trillions of microorganisms in the gut which perform important functions in the immune system and metabolism by providing essential inflammatory mediators, nutrients and vitamins -- can help regulate brain function through something called the "gut-brain axis." Recent research also suggests that mental disorders could be treated by regulating the intestinal...

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Mum dies after shunning NHS treatment for curable cancer and going vegan instead

A mum who was diagnosed with treatable breast cancer has died after shunning medicine in favour of living a vegan and holistic lifestyle. Katie Britton-Jordan, from Dalbury Lees, Derbyshire, was told she had triple negative breast cancer in July 2016 after finding a lump in her breast while feeding daughter Delilah when she was three. She was offered a mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy that would save her life but instead chose alternative methods including taking up a vegan diet. Her husband Neil announced Katie's death on Facebook yesterday. ...

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Can science tell us how much alcohol you can drink safely?

Humans have been drinking fermented concoctions since the beginning of recorded time. But despite that long relationship with alcohol, we still don't know what exactly the molecule does to our brains to create a feeling of intoxication. Likewise, though the health harms of heavy drinking are fairly obvious, scientists have struggled to identify what negative impacts lesser volumes may lead to. Last September, the prestigious peer-reviewed British medical journal The Lancet published a study that is thought to be the most comprehensive global analysis of the risks of alcohol consumption. Its conclusion, which the media widely reported, sounded unequivocal: "The safest level of drinking is none." Sorting through the latest research on how to optimize your well-being is a constant and confounding feature of modern life. A scientific study becomes a press release becomes a news alert, shedding context at...

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Is there a proper way to shower?

Taking a daily shower is a fairly recent development for Americans. Just 100 years ago, many thought getting their whole body wet at once (instead of taking the sponge baths that were common then) would invite diseases like pneumonia and someone would "catch their death." Nowadays, a long, hot shower is a daily ritual for Many Americans. Most soaps and personal care products have surfactants that, when combined with water, bind to oil and remove the beneficial fats called sebum that naturally protect your skin.1 Generally speaking, the more a product bubbles or lathers, the more surfactants it contains. Many people spend money to buy expensive lotions to restore or replenish the natural skin oils they remove when they shower. The irony is that most of the skin lotions people buy to use after they shower are far inferior to...

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British woman wakes up from coma speaking fluent French

It was May 2006, and I had just been swimming. I was on my way from my home in Hastings to work as a revenue executive for HMRC. It was raining hard, and the visibility was terrible. I was crossing the road when a white van drove into me and I fell, hit the side of my head, and rolled under a parked car. I have no memory of it. In fact I didn't remember anything from a year before the accident until four years afterwards; I began to work out what had happened to me from what other people told me. I was in an induced coma for three weeks in the neurological unit attached to Haywards Heath hospital. The medical staff tried to bring me out of the coma after about 10 days, but it was too early....

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Letter to doctors: It’s time to redefine ‘EMF sensitivity’

Even though I too am hypersensitive to EMF, I am concerned that the terms EMF Sensitivity and Hypersensitivity may be too compartmental, when the ramifications are so profound and universal. By identifying our symptoms as somehow unique to us alone, we are separating ourselves from the rest of humanity. We become "those" people, different from all the rest. However, there are at least two other categories: Those who are experiencing symptoms, but neither they nor their doctors are aware of the issue, and there could be millions of them. Then there those who are aware, but are not experiencing symptoms, so they feel free to ignore the issue, thinking it's just "those" people who have a problem. Unfortunately, EMF Sensitivity is not the same as an allergic reaction. Without intervention, those allergic to peanuts would likely die, while others can...

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Study finds red meat as part of a healthy diet linked to reduced risk of multiple sclerosis

People who consume unprocessed red meat as part of a healthy Mediterranean diet may reduce their risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), new research led by Curtin University and The Australian National University has found. The research, published in The Journal of Nutrition, examined data from 840 Australians who took part in the Ausimmune Study to determine whether there was a link between consuming a Mediterranean diet that includes unprocessed red meat, such as lamb, beef and pork, and a reduced risk of a first episode of CNS demyelination, a common precursor to MS. Lead author Dr. Lucinda Black, from the School of Public Health at Curtin University who completed the research as part of her MSWA Postdoctoral Fellowship, said the number of people being diagnosed with MS was increasing globally, suggesting that environmental factors such as low sun exposure, low...

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Bye-bye superbugs? Scientists discover compound toxic to antibiotic resistant bacteria

Deadly, drug-resistant superbugs that endanger millions every year could soon be knocked out after scientists have discovered a compound that is toxic to the dangerous bacteria but not to humans. Gram negative bacteria is a multi-drug resistant bug that threatens hospitals and nursing homes with deadly illnesses like pneumonia and bloodstream infections. It is an incredibly difficult infection to treat and is top of the World Health Organization's list of priority pathogens that need new medicines. No new treatments have been created in 50 years. However that looks set to change after researchers from Sheffield University tweaked the structures of metal-based compounds found in anticancer drugs. "We ended up with something that was toxic towards bacteria, particularly gram negative bacteria, and not toxic towards humans,"said Jim Thomas, professor of bio-inorganic chemistry at Sheffield University. ...

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