The Impact of Vaccines on Mortality Decline Since 1900—According to Published Science

By JB Handley, Children's Health Defense Director and Co-Founder of Generation Rescue Since 1900, there's been a 74% decline in mortality rates in developed countries, largely due to a marked decrease in deaths from infectious diseases. How much of this decline was due to vaccines? The history and data provide clear answers that matter greatly in today's vitriolic debate about vaccines. CHICAGO, Illinois —Since 1900, the mortality rate in America and other first-world countries has declined by roughly 74%, creating a dramatic improvement in quality of life and life expectancy for Americans. The simple question: "How did this happen?" ...

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WHO issues dire warning about “inevitable” global flu pandemic

The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a call to arms to prevent the next great influenza pandemic. While praising how far humanity has come, the health chief warns that we are nowhere near prepared enough. "The threat of pandemic influenza is ever-present,"said WHO director-general Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. "The question is not if we will have another pandemic, but when." The warning came as the WHO announced its new Global Influenza Strategy for 2019-2030 amid an estimated 1 billion annual cases of influenza, of which 3 to 5 million are considered severe resulting in between 290,000 and 650,000 influenza-related deaths each year. ...

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SOTT FOCUS: The ‘Keto Crotch’ Phenomenon Illustrates How to Circulate Lies in the ‘Free Press’

If you're one who pays attention to the trends in mainstream dietary advice, and I'm certainly not recommending staying up to date with that complete trainwreck, you'll notice that the mainstream media are rather consistent in their constant misguided warnings against low carb, ketogenic diets. It's rather glaring that this approach to eating is a threat in some way to the established dietary dogma of the day. On the surface, it looks like just a petty back-and-forth about something as inane as diet - "veganism is the best!" "No, keto's the best!" The average person would be forgiven for thinking the whole thing is rather stupid and ignoring it all. But there's more behind this than may first meet the eye, and a recent example of propaganda gracing the collective information dumpster that is the internet is quite illustrative of...

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What happens to the human body when it goes into ketosis?

From a young age we're taught that eating three meals a day, plus snacks, is healthy and necessary for the human body to function normally, and this rhetoric still dominates North American food guides today. Mark Mattson, the Current Chief of the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the National Institute on Aging, once asked: Why is it that the normal diet is three meals a day plus snacks? . . . There are a lot of pressures to have that eating pattern, there's a lot of money involved. The food industry - are they going to make money from skipping breakfast like I did today? No, they're going to lose money. If people fast, the food industry loses money. What about the pharmaceutical industries? What if people do some intermittent fasting, exercise periodically and are very healthy? Is the pharmaceutical industry...

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Dr. Fauci, it’s not nice to fool Congress about vaccine reactions

On Feb. 27, 2019, the U.S. House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations held a public hearing on "Confronting a Growing Public Health Threat: Measles Outbreaks in the U.S" that was also broadcast live on C-span. Parents across the nation watched and heard the renowned Anthony Fauci, MD, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),1 either tell a bald faced lie or show his ignorance when he testified, under oath, that MMR vaccine does not cause encephalitis. This large dose of disinformation drew gasps of protest from parents attending the Capitol Hill hearing and prompted Committee Chair Diana DeGette (D-CO) to bang the gavel and warn that "manifestations of approval or disapproval of the proceedings is in violation of the rules of the House and this Committee." It is really hard to watch a distinguished physician like...

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Taking the dog for a walk may not be a good idea for the elderly

Elderly people who own dogs should probably think twice before taking it for a walk, US figures show. In a Research Letter published in the journal JAMA Surgery, researchers led by Kevin Pirruccio from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, reveal that in 2017, the latest figures available, thousands of people aged over 65 were admitted to hospital suffering injuries sustained while walking dogs. All the dogs, by the way, were on leashes at the time. The researchers used a records form 100 US hospital emergency departments to sample dog-walking injuries among the elderly between the years of 2004 and 2017. They discovered that the number of reported injuries almost tripled over the period, from 1671 at the start of the period to 4396 at the end. ...

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FDA approves anti-depressant nasal spray based on ketamine party drug

The Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug that can relieve depression in hours instead of weeks. Esketamine, a chemical cousin of the anesthetic and party drug ketamine, represents the first truly new kind of depression drug since Prozac hit the market in 1988. The FDA's decision came Tuesday, less than a month after a panel of experts advising the agency voted overwhelmingly in favor of approval. "There has been a long-standing need for additional effective treatments for treatment-resistant depression, a serious and life-threatening condition," said Dr. Tiffany Farchione, acting director of the Division of Psychiatry Products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, in a press release about the decision. "This is potentially a game changer for millions of people," said Dr. Dennis Charney, dean of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New...

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UK patient ‘free’ of HIV after stem cell treatment

A UK patient's HIV has become "undetectable" following a stem cell transplant - in only the second case of its kind, doctors report in Nature. The London patient, who was being treated for cancer, has now been in remission from HIV for 18 months and is no longer taking HIV drugs. The researchers say it is too early to say the patient is "cured" of HIV. Experts say the approach is not practical for treating most people with HIV but may one day help find a cure. ...

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Fatty liver disease is triggered by choline deficiency

Choline, initially discovered in 1862,1 was officially recognized as an essential nutrient for human health by the Institute of Medicine in 1998.2 This nutrient, which you need to get from your diet, is required for:3 Healthy fetal development4 - Choline is required for proper neural tube closure,5 brain development and healthy vision.6 Research shows mothers who get sufficient choline impart lifelong memory enhancement to their child due to changes in the development of the hippocampus (memory center) of the child's brain.7 Choline deficiency also raises your risk of premature birth, low birth weight and preeclampsia The synthesis of phospholipids, the most common of which is phosphatidylcholine, better known as lecithin, which constitutes between 40 and 50 percent of your cellular membranes and 70 to 95 percent of the phospholipids in lipoproteins and bile8 ...

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Propaganda Alert! UNICEF blames ‘vaccine hesitancy’ for measles uptick

Global progress in the fight against measles eroded last year and "vaccine hesitancy" is among the reasons, according to a report released Friday by the United Nations Children's Fund on an alarming spike in the disease. The report says 98 percent of countries reported an uptick in measles cases in 2018. Ukraine, the Philippines and Brazil had the largest increases. "This is a wake up call. We have a safe, effective and inexpensive vaccine against a highly contagious disease - a vaccine that has saved almost a million lives every year over the last two decades," the release quotes Henrietta Fore, UNICEF's executive director. Measles is becoming more common in both developed and developing countries, UNICEF reports. Reasons for the disease's uptick include inadequate health infrastructure and civil unrest in addition to "low community awareness, complacency and vaccine hesitancy" in...

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