What the world needs: Safe, affordable and effective medicines

If one has a heart, for humanity, one would choose a list of affordable medicines that are safe and easy to administer so that even the poor could afford them. It is highly insensitive for modern medicine to promote medicines that most people cannot afford. The worst examples of this are the new medicines oncologists are beginning to use, instead of chemotherapy, that stimulate the immune system. It does not help the competition between modern pharmacology and the natural medicines we are presenting here that most pharmaceuticals are mitochondria poisons that do not cure people of anything. The key factors in choosing medicines for the world would be their affordability, accessibly, their strength and effectiveness. The most basic medicines on our list are all natural medicines like sodium bicarbonate, magnesium chloride, selenium, sulfur, zinc, boron, potassium bicarbonate, boron, zinc and...

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How to get more vitamin D during the winter when the days shorten

As winter approaches, we find ourselves cooped up indoors more enjoying those hot cups of coffee or cocoa, and dismissing the idea of venturing out in the cold. However, our bodies need sunlight and vitamin D, especially in the winter when the days shorten. It's difficult to get enough vitamin D in the winter. The days are shorter and the weather is cold and gloomy and the dreaded cold and flu season is in full swing. But you definitely should venture outside some, because so many studies show that vitamin D helps reduce the risk of colds and flu, giving your immune system a huge boost. The Vitamin D Council recommends vitamin D to help prevent colds and flu (URI or upper respiratory infections) based on the findings of two large meta-analyses (the strongest proof in medicine) published in respected...

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Because no one asked: GMO avocados in development

Avocados not only are one of the world's healthiest fruits, they're also among the most economically important, representing a $13 billion market in 2017.1 Avocados have been enjoyed since ancient times, but their DNA has been largely foreign — until now. A group of U.S. and Mexican scientists have sequenced the genomes of Mexican and well-known Hass avocados. Their study, published in PNAS,2 reveals "ancient evolutionary relationships" that give clues to the fruit's origins but also opens the floodgates to future genetic modification of this already perfect food. Indeed, as The New York Times put it, the research is "likely to become the foundation for breeding techniques and genetic modifications designed to produce avocados that can resist disease or survive in drier conditions."3 ...

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Biological resetting: Novel therapies to heal nerve and neuropathic pain

Dr. Matthew Cook is a former anesthesiologist who became a regenerative medicine specialist and founder of BioReset Medical1 in Campbell, California. In this interview, we discuss several novel therapies offered there, which can be next to impossible to find elsewhere. "I went to medical school and did an anesthesiology residency at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) ... I was doing regional anesthesia, so I was basically doing nerve blocks all day, every day ... After that ... I figured out how to do almost every surgery, from total knee replacement to shoulder surgery, without having to do general anesthesia. I sort of evolved into finding out that I could fix a lot of those problems either by treating nerves or treating ligaments, tendons, fascia and joints. I started the regenerative medicine practice. As part of my journey of doing...

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Opioid crisis: Aberration or logical outgrowth of a psychopathic for-profit healthcare system?

Four major drug companies have reached a partial settlement over their role in the opioid epidemic, dodging a federal trial. The drug plague is less of an accident than an inevitable consequence of a for-profit healthcare system. US drug distributors AmerisourceBergen Corp., Cardinal Health Inc., and McKesson Corp. - as well as Israel-based drug manufacturer Teva Pharmaceuticals - have tentatively settled suits with two Ohio counties for $260 million, over charges they misled the public about the addictive potential of their drugs. The deal narrowly avoids a federal trial that was set to start on Monday, but does not address some 2,600 other suits nationwide against those companies and others - including Purdue Pharma, the company that kicked off the epidemic with its blockbuster opioid OxyContin. More than 20 years and 400,000 deaths after the debut of the devastatingly popular...

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Surprising benefits of exercising before breakfast

According to a new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism health scientists at the universities of Bath and Birmingham found that by changing the timing of when you eat and exercise, people can better control their blood sugar levels. The six-week study, which involved thirty men classified as obese or overweight and compared results from two intervention groups (who ate breakfast before / after exercise) and a control group (who made no lifestyle changes), found that people who performed exercise before breakfast burned double the amount of fat than the group who exercised after breakfast. They found that increased fat use is mainly due to lower insulin levels during exercise when people have fasted overnight, which means that they can use more of the fat from their fat tissue and the fat within their muscles as...

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